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Sinuous Cup Coral

Symphyllia agaricia

Description:

This coral is identified by the colony's large, pink-centered and thick-ridged corallites. Colonies appear as nearly perfect spheres, frequently reaching a meter across.

Habitat:

This species occurs in many parts of the world, and often in shallow tropical waters.

1 Species ID Suggestions

Symphyllia agaricia


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15 Comments

Blogie
Blogie 10 years ago

I see your point, Alvin. Changing the names now. Thanks again!!

AlvinAngeloA.Salting
AlvinAngeloA.Salting 10 years ago

hi Blogs! actually they are rather sinuous however not very elongated which is characteristic of symphyllia. on the other hand, favids have distinct conical corallites. hope this helps!

Blogie
Blogie 10 years ago

Hi Alvin. This does look like S. agaricia, but the corallites here seem cell-shaped and not sinuous, don't you think?

AlvinAngeloA.Salting
AlvinAngeloA.Salting 10 years ago



Characters: Colonies are hemispherical to flat. Valleys are sinuous or straight, averaging 35 millimetres wide and are usually separated by a narrow groove. Walls have a thick fleshy appearance. Septa are thick and have large teeth. Columellae are usually in two rows. Colour: Brown, green or red, usually with distinctly contrasting valley and wall colours. Similar species: Symphyllia radians, which has smaller, straighter valleys. See also S. hassi. Lobophyllia flabelliformis can look similar underwater. Habitat: Exposed upper reef slopes. Abundance: Uncommon.

Source reference: Veron (2000). Taxonomic reference: Veron and Pichon (1980). Additional identification guides: Veron (1986), Nishihira and Veron (1995).

Blogie
Blogie 10 years ago

Every little effort counts, my friend! I hope you'll pursue your goal to become a coral specialist. (But pls also keep in mind the Project Noah guidelines I mentioned in a comment on one of your spottings.)

Btw pls don't call me "sir" anymore. :)

RexRietaVillavelez
RexRietaVillavelez 10 years ago

ahahahaa,, trying my best sir., i actually want to be a coral specialist.. >_< aahaha,, so im doing little things like this. ^_^

Blogie
Blogie 10 years ago

Ayos! Then there's someone I can rely on for coral IDs here. ;)

Blogie
Blogie 10 years ago

Ayos! Then there's someone I can rely on for coral IDs here. ;)

RexRietaVillavelez
RexRietaVillavelez 10 years ago

No problem sir, i actually had fun looking for it, i had this in my database of species in my research at Lagundi reef.. ^_^

Blogie
Blogie 10 years ago

Aha! You nailed it, Rex! Thanks for the ID!

RexRietaVillavelez
RexRietaVillavelez 10 years ago

cge sir i'll see,,good point sir.. ^_^

Blogie
Blogie 10 years ago

Hmmm... On P. daedalea, the furrows are contiguous, but on this coral it's different. P. daedalea looks like a maze, doesn't it? This one looks like it's made up of squished cells. :)

RexRietaVillavelez
RexRietaVillavelez 10 years ago

i think coloration is the one only thing different sir..

Blogie
Blogie 10 years ago

Hey Rex. Thanks for the suggestion, but I doubt if this is Platygyra daedalea. The furrows or striations are different on the lesser valley coral, I think...

RexRietaVillavelez
RexRietaVillavelez 10 years ago

Sir its not a brain coral.. i thought at first it was.. ^_^

Blogie
Spotted by
Blogie

Davao Del Norte, Philippines

Spotted on Jan 7, 2012
Submitted on Jan 25, 2012

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