Contact Blog Project Noah Facebook Project Noah Twitter

A global citizen science platform
to discover, share and identify wildlife

Join Project Noah!

The Turkey Tail

Trametes versicolor

Description:

Cap: Up to 10 cm across; only a few mm thick; flexible when fresh; circular, semicircular, bracket-shaped, or kidney-shaped; often fused with other caps; densely hairy or velvety, often with alternating zones of texture; with concentric zones of white, brown, cinnamon, and reddish brown (but highly variable in color and sometimes with other shades, including blue, green, and orange). Pore Surface: Whitish to pale grayish; not bruising; with 4 or more tiny pores per mm; tubes up to 3 mm deep. Flesh: Insubstantial; whitish; tough and leathery. Odor and Taste: Not distinctive. Spore Print: Whitish.

Habitat:

Ecology: Saprobic on the deadwood of hardwoods, or rarely on the wood of conifers; annual; causing a white rot of the sapwood; growing in dense, overlapping clusters or rosettes on logs and stumps; year-round; very widely distributed and common in Shivalik regions of Himalaya .

Notes:

Trametes versicolor, often called the "turkey tail," has the dubious distinction of being the only member of the forest fungal fowl community not named for the full bird, but a feathery fraction. However, the chicken of the woods and the hen of the woods look nothing at all like chickens or hens, while the turkey tail does look (vaguely) like a turkey's tail. Who started this clucking menagerie of mushroom monikers, anyway? Was Old MacDonald a mycologist?

Species ID Suggestions



Sign in to suggest organism ID

No Comments

SanjaySaklani
Spotted by
SanjaySaklani

Punjab, India

Spotted on Jan 29, 2012
Submitted on Jan 29, 2012

Related Spottings

Trametes Mushroom Trametes Turkey Tail Striegelige Tramete

Nearby Spottings

Old World Monkey Red-rumped Swallow Spotting Himalayan Honey Bee