Contact Blog Project Noah Facebook Project Noah Twitter

A global citizen science platform
to discover, share and identify wildlife

Join Project Noah!

Locust Borer

Megacyllene robiniae

Description:

Black longhorn beetle with yellow transverse bands. The third band on the elytra is W-shaped. These beetles are endemic to eastern North America.

Habitat:

Spotted in a rural backyard.

Notes:

The larvae of this beetle feed on Black Locust. They are considered a serious pest as previously weakened or damaged trees are often killed by infestations of the larvae.

Species ID Suggestions



Sign in to suggest organism ID

24 Comments

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thanks Hari and Rick :)

Hariprasad V N
Hariprasad V N 2 years ago

Congratulations ! Excellent photo.

RickBohler
RickBohler 2 years ago

Congratulations Christine.... Awesome shots too!

maplemoth662
maplemoth662 2 years ago

Your welcome, Christine....

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thanks Felix and maplemoth!

maplemoth662
maplemoth662 2 years ago

Congratulations Christine, for getting the SOTW, for this week.....

Felix Fleck
Felix Fleck 2 years ago

Fantastic shots! Congrats, Christine.

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thanks Mark - perfect terminology "spectacular pest"!

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thank you Brian

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 years ago

Congratulations. Such a spectacular pest.

Brian38
Brian38 2 years ago

Congratulations Christine! A well deserved SOTW!

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thanks so much for SOTW and for highlighting the problems this pest species can cause!

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Congratulations Christine, your locust borer has been voted Spotting of the Week! The series of images, information, mission assignment, reference, multiple tags and general interest of this spotting were appreciated.

"A serious pest to black locust trees (Robinia pseudoacacia), this Locust Borer (Megacyllene robiniae) is our Spotting of the Week. This longhorn beetle (family Cerambycidae) is endemic to eastern North America. Its geographic range has grown over the years with the expansion of R. pseudoacacia. Larvae spend the winter hibernating within the bark and start burrowing at springtime. With infestation tree trunks and branches can weaken and become susceptible to wind breakage.
Find out more about locust borers here: https://buff.ly/2fqY3P0 "

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/projectnoah/pho...

Twitter:
https://twitter.com/projectnoah/status/9...

maplemoth662
maplemoth662 2 years ago

Congratulations, on your nomination....

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thank you for the nomination!

AshleyT
AshleyT 2 years ago

Your spotting has been nominated for the Spotting of the Week. The winner will be chosen by the Project Noah Rangers based on a combination of factors including: uniqueness of the shot, status of the organism (for example, rare or endangered), quality of the information provided in the habitat and description sections. There is a subjective element, of course; the spotting with the highest number of Ranger votes is chosen. Congratulations on being nominated!

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thanks SukanyaDatta :)

SukanyaDatta
SukanyaDatta 2 years ago

An absolute OMG shot!!!

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thank you Rick and Jim!

Jim Nelson
Jim Nelson 2 years ago

Interesting posting, and excellent photography, Christine. Well done!

RickBohler
RickBohler 2 years ago

Nice capture!

maplemoth662
maplemoth662 2 years ago

Your welcome, Christine Y.

Christine Y.
Christine Y. 2 years ago

Thanks maplemoth

maplemoth662
maplemoth662 2 years ago

Beautiful photos...

Christine Y.
Spotted by
Christine Y.

Rhode Island, USA

Spotted on Sep 17, 2017
Submitted on Sep 18, 2017

Related Spottings

Locust Borer Locust Borer Locust borer Megacyllene Locust Borer

Nearby Spottings

Jack-in-the-Pulpit Fruit Orchard Orbweaver Candy-striped Leafhopper Spotting