Guardian Nature School Contact Blog Project Noah Facebook Project Noah Twitter

A global citizen science platform
to discover, share and identify wildlife

Join Project Noah!
nature school apple icon

Nature School For Teachers - Fall 2020 Launch! visit nature school

Alydid (Broad headed bug)

Mutusca brevicornis

Description:

A small creature that seems to be mimicking a seed. 10mm long and very narrow; some stripes full length; plain pale underneath (pic#2);

Habitat:

Long coarse grasses (with seeds)

Notes:

Today I noticed that all our long grasses have gone to seed. I also noticed 3 new creatures, all tiny, and all seem to be mimicking grass seed. (So surprise me. ) Thanks for ID to Dr Mali Malipatil (Vic DPI) who also commented that these are usually restricted to northern Australia. http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Mutusca+br...

Species ID Suggestions



Sign in to suggest organism ID

10 Comments

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

ID changed.

MaryEvans2
MaryEvans2 8 years ago

Another interesting looking bug. Nice spotting

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 8 years ago

Ok now I see the proboscis.
I'll be after some closer pics of this one if possible.

MartinL
MartinL 8 years ago

Good ID Argybee, I'm sure it is correct. Check this side profile pic compared with yours http://bugguide.net/node/view/434620/bgp... you can see the proboscis a bit more clearly than in your pic.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 8 years ago

Thanks LivanEscudero. I found some Aus examples from your direction. Never seen these before. It's great to find something new.

LivanEscudero
LivanEscudero 8 years ago

This is definitively a True Bug. I think I can see the proboscis in the first pic; as for the division on the underside, I think that is where the proboscis is placed when foldd flat against the body. I believe it is a Broad-headed Bug from the family Alydidae. Furthermore I would not be surprised if it's a Rice Bug (Genus Stenocoris) or some close kin in the subfamily Micrelytrinae.
See some American samples here:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/475907/bgp...

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 8 years ago

I'm getting curious about the structure of this creature. Pic #2 is ventral view head down. What do you think about the apparent division from the mouth parts to the abdomen? On a big blowup it really looks obvious. Think I'll put up that pic...

MartinL
MartinL 8 years ago

I cannot reconcile those tiny back legs to any orthopteran hopper and the hemipteran hoppers either. Flying short distances is typical of true bugs. I think you'll find it there. Even the antennae belong to a hemipteran .

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 8 years ago

Hi martin. The beastie did fly in short but quick bursts to get to the next grass. (like mini locusts) I'm unable to confirm any proboscis. I did think some kind of hopper. Thanks for the comment. Some digging to do.

MartinL
MartinL 8 years ago

Argybee. The best candidate for tiny phasmid is candovia http://www.flickr.com/photos/34449831@N0... These always have forelimbs that start thin and thicken as to fit around the head when held forwards. The body shape, legs and head all look wrong. The longer I look the more it seems to be a hemipteran bug. It would have wings and a proboscis. What do you think?

Mark Ridgway
Spotted by
Mark Ridgway

Victoria, Australia

Spotted on Feb 13, 2012
Submitted on Feb 13, 2012

Related Spottings

Broad-headed Bug

Nearby Spottings

Knobbly Crab Spider Black Robber Fly Brown house moth Orange Bracket Fungus

Reference

Noah Guardians
Noah Sponsors