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Iris

Description:

The genus is widely distributed throughout the north temperate zone. Their habitats are varied, ranging from cold and montane regions to the grassy slopes, meadowlands and riverbanks of Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa, Asia and across North America. Irises are perennial herbs, growing from creeping rhizomes (rhizomatous irises) or, in drier climates, from bulbs (bulbous irises). They have long, erect flowering stems which may be simple or branched, solid or hollow, and flattened or have a circular cross-section. The rhizomatous species usually have 3–10 basal sword-shaped leaves growing in dense clumps. The bulbous species have cylindrical, basal leaves. -- Wikipedia The iris flower is of interest as an example of the relation between flowering plants and pollinating insects. The shape of the flower and the position of the pollen-receiving and stigmatic surfaces on the outer petals form a landing-stage for a flying insect, which in probing the perianth for nectar, will first come in contact of perianth, then with the stigmatic stamens in one whorled surface which is borne on an ovary formed of three carpels. The shelf-like transverse projection on the inner whorled underside of the stamens is beneath the over-arching style arm below the stigma, so that the insect comes in contact with its pollen-covered surface only after passing the stigma; in backing out of the flower it will come in contact only with the non-receptive lower face of the stigma. Thus, an insect bearing pollen from one flower will, in entering a second, deposit the pollen on the stigma; in backing out of a flower, the pollen which it bears will not be rubbed off on the stigma of the same flower. -- Wikipedia

Habitat:

The genus is widely distributed throughout the north temperate zone. Their habitats are varied, ranging from cold and montane regions to the grassy slopes, meadowlands and riverbanks of Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa, Asia and across North America. -- Wikipedia

Notes:

This is one of a few species of Iris in my garden. It is actually a trade from a fellow gardener. That is one of the great things about iris, people love to share them with others. Every species I have I did not purchase I have been given. They are a beautiful showy flower (especially the large bearded varieties like this one) and make for great cut flowers.


1 Species ID Suggestions

MICHELLE
MICHELLE 7 years ago
this a species of Orchids, And may I ad they are very beautiful.


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10 Comments

Adarsha B S
Adarsha B S 6 years ago

Very nice spotting and great info :)

Jason Alexander
Jason Alexander 6 years ago

Pretty color!

MayraSpringmann
MayraSpringmann 7 years ago

Mine are as few lilac color!

Apple
Apple 7 years ago

Yes, I have tons of them in my garden, they have been shared with me by a fellow gardener who loves them but had too many.

MayraSpringmann
MayraSpringmann 7 years ago

I did not know this species with two colors!

Apple
Apple 7 years ago

Thank you to all for your compliments. I love my irises they are very showy, I cannot wait to get the dark purple (almost black) ones photographed this spring.

misako
misako 7 years ago

beautiful irises!

Wild Things
Wild Things 7 years ago

Nice colours.

Apple
Apple 7 years ago

@MICHELLE- it is definitely a bearded iris. I don't believe that iris or actually a direct relative of orchids, or are they?

Apple
Apple 7 years ago

OK, sounds good. Would love to see where it originates and is indigenous. Beautiful stuff.

AntónioGinjaGinja
AntónioGinjaGinja 7 years ago

Beautiful,i spot one of those today,i have to upload it to se if you agree that is the same flower:)

Apple
Spotted by
Apple

Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA

Lat: 42.96, Long: -85.66

Spotted on May 25, 2007
Submitted on Feb 18, 2012

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Reference