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Coast Live Oak

Quercus Agrifolia

Description:

Large trees with dark, curved leaves with spiny teeth. They grow up to 25 meters tall. "The trunk, particularly for older individuals, may be highly contorted, massive and gnarled. The crown is broadly rounded and dense, especially when aged 20 to 70 years; in later life the trunk and branches are more well defined and the leaf density lower." - Wikipedia

Habitat:

This Oak forest is at Blue Sky Ecological Reserve. "Coast Live Oak is the only California native oak that actually thrives in the coastal environment, although it is rare on the immediate shore; it enjoys the mild winter and summer climate afforded by ocean proximity, and it is somewhat tolerant of aerosol-borne sea salt. The coastal fog supplies relief from the rainless California summer heat. Normally the tree is found on well drained soils of coastal hills and plains, often near year round or perennial streams. It may be found in several natural communities including Coast Live Oak woodland, Engelmann Oak woodland, Valley Oak woodland and both northern and southern mixed evergreen forests. While normally found within 100 kilometers of the Pacific Ocean at elevations less than 700 meters, in southern California it occasionally occurs at up to 1,500 meters in altitude." - Wikipedia

Notes:

This series has various lighting which gives the forest a different feel.

No species ID suggestions

23 Comments

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

Thank you Meik!

Meik
Meik 6 years ago

Beautiful pictures!

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

Great info Emma! Thank you

Hema
Hema 6 years ago

forest fires are great for biodiversity. After a fire, different habitats develop in forest openings. This creates a mosaic of new habitats that encourage new species to enter the area. Also forest fires reduce the probability of disease or insect infestation. forest fires can improve the health of a forest by removing trees weakened by insects or disease. This also decreases the chance of future infestations and outbreaks.
Wild fires have been natural occurences, and are another one of the dynamics of that created the amazing earth we live in today

Hema
Hema 6 years ago

Forest fires have the following benefits:
clear out dead branches and leaves
some plants seeds only germinate after a fire
new growth is low to the ground and accessible to animals for food
minerals are returned to the soil
dead trees are removed
the burned areas are suitable for new species of animals

Jeannette
Jeannette 6 years ago

It looks so enchanting :)

It reminds me of a place in The New Forest in England...

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

That's what happened here! We had massive wildfires and the Oaks stood their ground while everything else burnt to nothing or was very damaged.

VivBraznell
VivBraznell 6 years ago

I love trees! I'm currently living in Thailand, surrounded by palms and when I go back to England the tree shapes just 'blow me away', especially the deciduous trees in the winter. I took so many photos in Dec - Jan when I was there. I think my friends got fed up with me saying "Wow! What a beautiful tree" ... did I mention I love trees?

AntónioGinjaGinja
AntónioGinjaGinja 6 years ago

once i observ a mountain all burned and in the midle there was two circular areas of oaks almost without any burning aspect,it looks impossible,because there where intire mountais burned,these trees as a hugh resistance to fires and fires like a natural event are also very important in the life of many species

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

Thank you chebeague3 :)

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

Thank you both. After living in So-Cal for 18 years, I've finally started to find and appreciate beauty in the dry, scrub landscape. Stark contrast to the Pacific Northwest! This Oak forest somehow meets in the middle and I feel very peaceful here.

chebeague3
chebeague3 6 years ago

Nice Picture!

LarsKorb
LarsKorb 6 years ago

Yes, Cindy, I remembered what you told about the burned oaks. You caught it really nice - I can almost feel the quiet there.

AntónioGinjaGinja
AntónioGinjaGinja 6 years ago

Beautiful place,great photos

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

Thank you Lars! You inspired it. Well, your fungi did. The Candlestick Fungus :)

LarsKorb
LarsKorb 6 years ago

Beautiful series

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

Fire is a necessity for some plants to live but it takes away so many! We do have a lot of plants that weren't here before that are known to appear after fires.

Hema
Hema 6 years ago

Cindy,one of the benefits of wild fires is that it opens up large pine cones, which are bound by some substance, for seed dispersal . Especially the coulterrii pine cones.

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

Most of these trees were burnt in wildfires in 2007 but have recovered. That's why the bark is so dark.

Hema
Hema 6 years ago

Cindy, I am happy I ID'd this. Quite surprised by the ID though.
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/943...

Hema
Hema 6 years ago

i love taking walks in these kind of places too.Mt Diablo has many such trails.

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 6 years ago

:) I love walking here. The Oaks definitely make it cooler and as you said, scenic.

Hema
Hema 6 years ago

scenic!

San Diego, California, USA

Lat: 33.03, Long: -117.01

Spotted on Mar 13, 2012
Submitted on Mar 16, 2012

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