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Malcolm Wilton-Jones

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John Curd Common Darter
Common Darter commented on by John Curd Castilla-La Mancha, Spain5 years ago

PS: S. vulgatum females also show a VERY prominent vulvar scale, sticking down almost at 90 degrees. This vulvar scale is very S. striolatum.

John Curd Common Darter
Common Darter commented on by John Curd Castilla-La Mancha, Spain5 years ago

Yes, Malcolm, elderly female Common Darter (Sympetrum striolatum) it is. The abdominal side markings are classic.

As you say, females of both S. vulgatum and S. sinaiticum are very similar but S. sinaiticum would show relatively strong dark marks on the high side of S2&3 (not present here) and S. vulgatum would show quite strong black descending the side of the frons (also not here).

You took the right pictures. ;-)

John Curd Spotting
Spotting commented on by John Curd Indonesia6 years ago

That looks like Neurothemis terminata to me. I think the shape of the outer edge of the hind wing markings is the pointer, though they can be tricky little devils. N. fluctuans has a more curved edge on the hind wing markings.

John Curd Epaulet Skimmer
Epaulet Skimmer commented on by John Curd Comunitat Valenciana, Spain6 years ago

Nice picture of an Epaulet, Malcolm. Did you notice this habit the skimmers have of sitting on just four legs with their front legs held up behind the eyes? Intriguing.

John Curd Dragonfly
Dragonfly commented on by John Curd Comunidad Valenciana / Comunitat Valenciana, Spain7 years ago

You've mixed a Ruddy Darter vernacular with a Red-veined Darter binomial. Easily done! :)

Either way, this looks red all over with a somewhat wide abdomen so my suspicion (not strong enough for an id) is that it might be a Broad Scarlet/Scarlet Darter (Crocethemis erythraea).

John Curd Common Darter
Common Darter commented on by John Curd Sagunto/Sagunt, Comunitat Valenciana, Spain7 years ago

The clues here are the way that the black edging the top of the frons does not extend down the sides of the frons, together with teh yellow stripe running down the otherwise black legs, a hint of antehumeral stripes and some black lines on teh side of the abdomen. (Southern Darter would have a similar frons but the legs and abdomen would look different.)

The pterostigmas are pale grey because this is recently emerged, also hinted at by the sheen on the wings. The pterostigmas will colour up later.

John Curd Robberfly
Robberfly commented on by John Curd Sagunto/Sagunt, Comunidad Valenciana / Comunitat Valenciana, Spain7 years ago

Interesting shot. The legs of the diner are certainly not those of a dragonfly (much too thick) but I have no idea what it might be.

You probably know this already but yes, dragonflies are cannibalistic. dragonflies frequently take damselflies and, perhaps less frequently, other dragonflies.

John Curd Long Skimmer
Long Skimmer commented on by John Curd Comunidad Valenciana / Comunitat Valenciana, Spain7 years ago

Well done, Malcolm, I think you're right; this is a maturing male that is yet to develop its expected colour. Such males often resemble the female.

When your book arrives, this species is not shown in your area but worry not, I have seen mature males in the marsh at Gandia.

John Curd Dragonfly
Dragonfly commented on by John Curd Perak, Malaysia7 years ago

You were quite right, Ictinogomphus decoratus.

There is nowhere near enough yellow on the thorax for I. rapax.

John Curd Dragonfly
Dragonfly commented on by John Curd Andalucía, Spain7 years ago

This one is an ovipositing female - they tend to be green but can turn blue looking more like the males later in life.

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