Guardian Nature School Contact Blog Project Noah Facebook Project Noah Twitter

A global citizen science platform
to discover, share and identify wildlife

Join Project Noah!
nature school apple icon

Nature School For Teachers - Fall 2020 Launch! visit nature school

JoshuaGSmith

JoshuaGSmith

I am an avid birder and citizen scientist. I love helping others identify wildlife and enjoy learning new things. I am also an Eagle Scout.

Anthem, AZ

  • adamscommand.blogspot.com
Sign In to follow

Friends

DanielePralong Jonathan Sequeira Malcolm Wilton-Jones dandoucette
HenryTang Caleb Strand AmolPandit Lainey
JoshuaGSmith Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by JoshuaGSmith Idaho, USA3 years ago

Cedar Waxwings most likely.

JoshuaGSmith Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher
Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher commented on by JoshuaGSmith Uttarakhand, India3 years ago

They are found in high densities in Uttarakhand as well as in other parts of India.

JoshuaGSmith Thayer's Gull?
Thayer's Gull? commented on by JoshuaGSmith Michigan, USA3 years ago

I'm assuming the bird in question is the one at center in the foreground, correct? If so, then I do believe it is an adult nonbreeding Thayer's. The extensive streaking around the neck and head combined with the 'softer' head shape and smallish bill are indicative of this species. I don't think the wing or back is too dark. I believe the overcast conditions in which the photo was taken intensified the color. Since I am not a gull expert, please wait for other comments before making your decision.

JoshuaGSmith Canada goose
Canada goose commented on by JoshuaGSmith Huntington Beach, California, USA3 years ago

Check out the vertical black band above the left leg of your bird. It is very similar to this photo:
http://www.birdinginformation.com/wp-con...

JoshuaGSmith Canada goose
Canada goose commented on by JoshuaGSmith Huntington Beach, California, USA3 years ago

When I zoom in, I realize that what looks like a fleshy-pink bill is actually a strip of land in the background. What looks like the rest of the head is actually the back of a goose's long neck and small head - most likely that of a Brant judging by the extensive white underparts. The stocky legs set far apart and the bulky undercarriage are indicative of a goose as well. Additionally, Brown Boobies are typically observed on prominent perches such as rocky outcroppings or man-made structures rather than on the ground or, especially, in shallow water.

JoshuaGSmith Western gull - 1st winter
Western gull - 1st winter commented on by JoshuaGSmith Huntington Beach, California, USA3 years ago

Haha! Anytime.

JoshuaGSmith Short-billed dowitcher
Short-billed dowitcher commented on by JoshuaGSmith Huntington Beach, California, USA3 years ago

Definitely a dowitcher. Working on species...

JoshuaGSmith bald eagle
bald eagle commented on by JoshuaGSmith Massachusetts, USA3 years ago

To complete your spotting, you should add the scientific name: Halieetus leucocephalus.

JoshuaGSmith Unidentified Urosaurus Lizard
Unidentified Urosaurus Lizard commented on by JoshuaGSmith San Tan Valley, Arizona, USA4 years ago

Kestrels are practically the size of Mourning Doves and Peregrines are larger than Cooper's. It's probably a Sharp-shinned, but I can't tell from the photo.

JoshuaGSmith Unidentified Urosaurus Lizard
Unidentified Urosaurus Lizard commented on by JoshuaGSmith San Tan Valley, Arizona, USA4 years ago

Hi! Nice to talk again. I've been extremely busy with college but decided to check on how PN is doing. Your bird very well might be a Merlin, but can you rule out Cooper's or Sharp-shinned Hawk?

Noah Guardians
Noah Sponsors