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Mr. Schaen

Mr. Schaen

First Grade Teacher in Wyoming, Ohio

United States

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maplemoth662
Mr. Schaen Firefly Sunshine
Firefly Sunshine commented on by Mr. Schaen Cincinnati, Ohio, United States4 months ago

We love your plant. We were in the garden too and one of our students had a good chance to observe it. He saw one bee and one ant on it. He even saw a spider web on it! We hope you have a good day!

Mr. Schaen Zinnia
Zinnia commented on by Mr. Schaen Cincinnati, Ohio, United States5 months ago

Thank you for the interesting information! We've talked in class about how bats eat bugs. So we think the bugs on the zinnias might be good for the bats to eat! By the way, the students took pictures in the garden today. I've added the pictures to our spotting. One is of a teeny tiny fly that was on the zinnias. The other is of a moth that was flying near the zinnias. We also saw a bee and ants. But, so far, we have not seen many other bugs yet. Maybe it's because our garden is still pretty new.

Mr. Schaen Zinnia
Zinnia commented on by Mr. Schaen Cincinnati, Ohio, United States5 months ago

That's very interesting information about flowers that stay open at night. We know that bats are nocturnal. So it makes sense that they will be more interested in flowers that are open at night so they can get their pollen. We also think it's cool that bats eat bugs. Very soon we are going to go out into the garden to see what animals might be there. We hope to see some lizards too!

Mr. Schaen Zinnia
Zinnia commented on by Mr. Schaen Cincinnati, Ohio, United States5 months ago

We just learned that swallowtail caterpillars would like to eat parsley, and then the butterflies would like to eat from zinnias. This is very good to know. Thanks for helping us get the idea! By the way, we are still wondering if bats will like the zinnias. Do you know the answer? Bye for now.

Mr. Schaen Peony
Peony commented on by Mr. Schaen Cincinnati, Ohio, United States5 months ago

From my observations, I found that as the flowers aged and stopped blooming, the wasps and hoverflies went away but the ants remained. From my research, I learned that peonies provide food for ants, so it makes sense that they stuck around!

Mr. Schaen Peony
Peony commented on by Mr. Schaen Cincinnati, Ohio, United States6 months ago

Thank you for your comment. I observed my peony last May on 3 straight sunny days, for 5 minutes each time. I observed a total 14 wasps and 22 hover flies! From my research I've learned that both wasps and hover flies are pollinators, so I respect your opinion.

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