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whirl_up_sea Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by whirl_up_sea Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA9 years ago

I don't think there is any way to permanently de-shroom an area of ground once the mycelium has set in. I think you would have to pick and toss them as they crop up.

whirl_up_sea Promethea Moth
Promethea Moth commented on by whirl_up_sea Canada9 years ago

Wow- I didn't know you could find those this far north. I'll have to keep my eyes open!

whirl_up_sea Orchids.
Orchids. commented on by whirl_up_sea Michigan, USA9 years ago

The natural colour was probably similar to that of the white/lavender ones behing the hyacinths.

whirl_up_sea Green Heron
Green Heron commented on by whirl_up_sea New York, USA9 years ago

I have seen a lot of Great Blue Herons here, but I can't recall ever seeing a baby Blue. When it stands up, are its legs and neck proportionately very long, like the adult Blue Heron? I am looking at pictures of young Blue Herons online, and this bird looks more stocky and "compact" than they do, though it might just be very young.

whirl_up_sea Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by whirl_up_sea Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA9 years ago


I don't think that it would be a bad idea to get rid of them, if they are in a high-traffic play area. They appear to be common types, and have a very short fruiting period anyway.

whirl_up_sea Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by whirl_up_sea Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA9 years ago


The second and third ones appear to be boletes of some variety. Again, these aren't likely to kill you, but some varieties are not classified as edible.

whirl_up_sea Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by whirl_up_sea Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA9 years ago

The first one definitely looks like a Russula (possibly R. amoenolens or a relative). From what I understand, these won't kill you, but a lot of them smell and taste really bad, and can cause gastrointestinal upset. I wouldn't consider it edible.

Wild mushrooms and "toadstools" are pretty much the same thing. I don't mind the term "toadstool" being used interchangably with "mushroom", but a lot of people don't like it, or use it to describe only poisonous fungi.

whirl_up_sea False Coral Snake, Falsa Cobra Coral
False Coral Snake, Falsa Cobra Coral commented on by whirl_up_sea São Paulo, Brazil9 years ago

"Red beside yellow kills a fellow / red beside black, venom lack"

Does anyone know if this old folk rule is actually accurate? It seems to be in this case.

I am very glad that you saved this beautiful snake.

whirl_up_sea orchids
orchids commented on by whirl_up_sea Michigan, USA9 years ago

I think that this is the Blue Mystique Phal. (http://www.homesteadgardens.com/departme...) The flowers are natural, but their colour is not.

whirl_up_sea Red and Black Ant carrying Ant
Red and Black Ant carrying Ant commented on by whirl_up_sea Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada9 years ago

I finally found out what is going on with these ants. Ants will often `piggyback` each other when they are traveling long distances. What I was seeing here was a very typical `social carrying`pose (See:http://www.flickr.com/photos/msitua/2661718938/in/set-72157607660637627). This means that the carried ant is neither dead nor larger than the carrying ant. It was simply rolled into a position that looks terribly awkward, but, since it is a classic social carrying posture, must be somehow comfortable.

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