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Hedge Grasshopper (nymph)

Valanga irregularis

Description:

Young and already voracious! This is a nymph of the Hedge Grasshopper, a species native to Australia and the largest grasshopper there. Adult length is 85 mm. The nymphs are green, or have a black and orange pattern like the one spotted here.

Habitat:

A suburban garden planted with Australian natives. The nymph is feasting on the leaves of a young Hymenosporum flavum or native frangipani, a rainforest tree.

Notes:

These are common and thrive in the Brisbane area, and will feed on many different leaves. They pass the winter in the adult stage. During the January to March period the population of this grasshopper is almost entirely nymphs, which mature by about April. Ref. Wildlife of Greater Brisbane, 2007. www.qm.qld.gov.au

No species ID suggestions

20 Comments

DanielePralong
DanielePralong a year ago

Thanks Juan! Pretty but hungry :-(

Juan DiTrani
Juan DiTrani a year ago

very impressive!

DanielePralong
DanielePralong a year ago

You're welcome Brandon! it's my pleasure to promote your mission:-) FYI the habitat is a suburban garden we redid 2 year ago and which is planted exclusively with South-East Queensland natives (60 different species). I hope it'll develop into a nice little habitat for many critters!

BrandonBlount
BrandonBlount a year ago

Daniele, Thank you so much for adding this to the Backyard Habitats Mission!

Very very cool little nymph! Quite the attractive little one.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong a year ago

This Australian grasshopper nymph has just joined Brandon Blount's Backyard Habitats mission, which has gone Global. Join the mission here:
http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/1075...

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Gracias Gerardo!

Gerardo Aizpuru
Gerardo Aizpuru 2 years ago

Grate photos !

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

That's OK Satyen, there will be enough to eat for everyone! I did relocate it though:-) They do like young leaves and this is a young tree.

Wild Things
Wild Things 2 years ago

Very sad.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Thanks Satyen! it's eating my garden though :-(

Wild Things
Wild Things 2 years ago

Fabulous clicks!

ShannaB
ShannaB 2 years ago

Yeah, all in my vegie garden (apart from one that was in my grandfather's vegie garden)! I have a few more different ones as well, just haven't got around to posting them yet.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Shanna :-( Fantastic that you have spotted all these different variations though!

ShannaB
ShannaB 2 years ago

Sigh, they are certainly everywhere! Here are a few of my other shots that show the colour variations.
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/987... (similar to this one)
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/903... (green with blue eyes)
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/862... (gree with pink eyes)

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

@Dan, the tree is misleadingy called frangipani because of a resemblance in the flowers. Indeed no relation of Plumeria. The flowers have a strong fragrance too. it's in thePittosporaceae. Here is a Pittosporum in its native environment in the Daintree forest: http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/636...

dandoucette
dandoucette 2 years ago

Beautiful tree, I hope it makes it too! The fragrance of Frangipani is one of my favorites, but I've never heard of this one, not in the Plumeria genus.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Gracias harsuame!

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Thanks Dan! The critter is unfortunately feeding on a "native frangipani" (Hymenosporum flavum) I only planted 2 years ago. I still hope this beautiful tree will get to 20m. Check it out!
http://anpsa.org.au/h-fla.html

dandoucette
dandoucette 2 years ago

Great macro!

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Here is the same nymph seen by ShannaB just a bit further north...
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/102...

4064, Queensland, Australia

Lat: -27.46, Long: 153.00

Spotted on Mar 23, 2012
Submitted on Apr 11, 2012

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Shorthorned Grasshoppers Short-horned Grasshopper Hedge Grasshopper Nymph Shorthorned Grasshopper

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