Project Noah

Project Noah is a tool to explore and document wildlife and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere.

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Project Noah iPhone and Android apps

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Grab a photograph of an interesting organism and share it with the community.

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Birds of the World

There are over 10,000 living species of birds on the planet. They can be found in ecosystems across ...

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Butterflies & Moths of the World

Butterflies and Moths are insects of the order Lepidoptera. Their brilliant colors have inspired ...

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National Geographic's Great Nature Project

National Geographic is urging everyone to get outside to explore nature. Participants are asked to ...

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WILD Cities: Urban Biodiversity

Millions of city-dwellers walk their local streets every day, but many overlook the multitude of ...

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Flowers of North America

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Moths of the World

Moths? Yes: a world of sphinxes, hawks, owls, tigers, and scary eyes, all waiting for you outside ...

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Mushroom Mapping

Mushroom ecology is a pivotal orientation point for exploring urban systems. Help us gather ...

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Mission WILD

The WILD Foundation works to protect & interconnect at least half of the planet’s land & water to ...

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International Spider Survey

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs. The International Society of Arachnology ...

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The Color Red

The color red is a bold color that represents passion. We would like to create a collection of ...

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Global Dragonflies & Damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are agile insects of the order Odonata. With a worldwide distribution ...

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Global Flight

To create a magnificent collection of images of your favourite fliers. Not just birds, but bats, ...

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Captive Animals

While we are all so focused on animals in nature, we ignore the fact theres wildlife in our own ...

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Flowers of Europe

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Nature in Yellow

It would be so interesting to see all the yellow flowers, fruits, insects, animals of the world.

Activity
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Sword Grass Brown spotted by Mark Ridgway Victoria, Australia 3 minutes ago

A large attractive butterfly which was cruising around in a lazy looping flight exploring the sword grass in a small nature reserve. Estimated size was about 60mm across. Rest with wings flat.

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Eastern Blue-tongue Lizard commented on by Neil Ross Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia 9 minutes ago

Ah the grill wasn't a problem once he got used to it. It was funny to watch.

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Sri Lanka blue magpie favorited by Sigg Sri Lanka 9 minutes ago

The Sri Lanka blue magpie is a member of the crow family living in the hill forests of Sri Lanka & It is endemic.This is a species of a dense wet evergreen temperate rain forest. It is declining due to loss of this habitat. Sri Lanka Blue Magpie is usually found in small groups of up to six or seven birds. It is largely carnivorous, eating small frogs, lizards, insects and other invertebrates, but will eat fruit.The cup-shaped stick nest is in a tree or shrub and there are usually 3–5 eggs laid. The eggs are white heavily spotted with brown. Both sexes build the nest and feed the young with only the female incubating them.The Sri Lanka blue magpie is about the same size as the European magpie at 42–47 cm. The adults are blue with chestnut head and wings, and a long white-tipped tail. The legs and bill are red. The young bird is a duller version of the adult.The Sri Lanka blue magpie has a variety of calls including mimicry, a loud chink-chink and a rasping krak-krak-krak-krak.(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Lanka_blue_magpie)

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Leaf twisting weevil favorited by Sigg Sri Lanka 10 minutes ago

The adult beetle twists the leaves into knots for the earlier stages of the insect.

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Sun conure commented on by Marta RubioTexeira Wallonie, Belgium 15 minutes ago

Thanks! They are so cute. I have one female as pet and she has the most lovely colors! :-)

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Unknown spotting favorited by fillsekors15 Lima, Lima, Peru 15 minutes ago

Gossypium barbadense, also known as extra long staple (ELS) cotton as it generally has a staple of at least 1 3/8" or longer, is a species of cotton plant. It is a tropical, frost-sensitive perennial plant that produces yellow flowers and has black seeds. This plant contains the chemical gossypol, which reduces its susceptibility to insect and fungal damage. In Suriname’s traditional medicine, the leaves of G. barbadense are used to treat hypertension and delayed/irregular menstruation. In Peru, cultivation of the indigenous cotton species Gossypium barbadense was the backbone of the development of coastal cultures such as the Norte Chico, Moche and Nazca. Cotton was grown upriver, made into nets and traded with fishing villages along the coast for large supplies of fish. The Spanish who came to Mexico in the early 1500s found the people growing cotton and wearing clothing made of it. Although South America is the center of origin of the species gossypium barbadense, to which ELS cottons belong, these cottons were photoperiodic, and the fiber was medium staple in length and coarse, as typified by the current Tanguis cottons of Peru. The first clear sign of domestication of this cotton species comes the Early Valdivia phase site of Real Alto on the coast of Ecuador (4400 BC) and from Ancon, a site on the Peruvian coast, where cotton bolls dating to 4200 BC were found. By 1000 BC, Peruvian cotton bolls were indistinguishable from modern cultivars of G. barbadense.

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Mapping Nature on Your Smartphone

For the developers at New York start-up Networked Organisms, smartphones are the butterfly nets of the 21st Century. Their tool, Project Noah, lets people upload photos of plants and wildlife around them, creating a map of the natural world and contributing to scientific research in the process.

WSJ
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What kind of beetle? This app knows

Bespectacled scientists of yore would carry around hefty field guides, made up of hundreds of pages of text and photos. But these days, smartphone owners have a lighter option: an app called Project Noah, which aims to help people identify plants and animals as well as collect data from "citizen scientists" about where certain species are located.

CNN
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Designing ecosystems for talent development

Project Noah enables us to be part of a more focused online community where we can learn more about wildlife around us and contribute to scientific research. It pulls participants into deeper, more meaningful engagement by enabling people to go on “missions” to collectively map changes based on sightings.

The Economist
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A smart way to save wildlife

A modern invention that may also hold the key to saving species in the future. Project Noah is a global study that encourages nature lovers to document the wildlife they encounter, using a purpose built phone app and web community. In addition to the virtual "collection" of species, Project Noah encourages citizen science by linking up with existing surveys including the International Spider Survey and the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network.

BBC
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Dial-a-Class

New mobile applications include a tool called NOAH that lets you take cellphone pictures of bugs and trees and then sends back an identification of the exact type in as little as 24 hours.

NY TIMES
With support from National Geographic