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Gordon Dietzman

Gordon Dietzman

Gordon Dietzman -- Worked with endangered species, am a wilderness canoeist, conservation educator, and nature photographer. Noah Ranger.

Minnesota, USALat: 46.73, Long: -94.69

  • www.gordondietzman.com
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Ariana susan.kirt3 rangergirl0141 David
outsidegirl0 Saint Paul Enviro Education dferris1 PaulWalter
Gordon Dietzman Tree Swallow
Tree Swallow commented on by Gordon Dietzman Wisconsin, USA3 months ago

This was a seriously underexposed photo that was taken against a cloudy sky. In the process of brightening it up somewhat so detail could be seen in the bird's feathers the sky went completely white. Hence its rather graphic look. It is indeed, however, a real photo. A few seconds later he swooped past my head in an attempt to drive me away from his nest box and the trail that went past it. It always startles me when a bird makes that type of dive, but then that's why it works...grin.

Gordon Dietzman White-tailed Deer
White-tailed Deer commented on by Gordon Dietzman Roseville, Minnesota, USA4 months ago

HA! I just missed that field.... Thanks for noticing. We actually had flurries here about two weeks ago. Fortunately the ground is warm enough none of it stuck for very long.... I'm really ready for spring. Six months of snow is one very long winter for us....

Gordon Dietzman White-tailed Deer
White-tailed Deer commented on by Gordon Dietzman Roseville, Minnesota, USA4 months ago

Even though this is the winter that would not end, the snow is finally gone. I'm just catching up from photos that I took this winter....grin.

Gordon Dietzman Wood Duck
Wood Duck commented on by Gordon Dietzman Roseville, Minnesota, USA4 months ago

Marta, I tried to get that last year by putting a motion-activated video camera under the nest box. Unfortunately, it failed to record the tiny ducklings plummeting to earth. Maybe they were too small to trigger the camera. Not sure why it didn't work. I did, however, get to see the little guys jump from the box. That is pretty rare as it doesn't take them more than a few seconds to empty the box. I snapped a couple of photos of them one of which was a previous spotting. See it at http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/319...

Gordon Dietzman Rock Squirrel
Rock Squirrel commented on by Gordon Dietzman Utah, USA4 months ago

Luis, I'm wondering if this isn't a young Rock Squirrel (Spermophilus variegatus). I'm not very familiar with the rodents of that area, but this animal has a rather bushy tail for a Uinta ground squirrel. But I'm just guessing.

Gordon Dietzman False bombardier beetle
False bombardier beetle commented on by Gordon Dietzman Emmaus, Pennsylvania, USA4 months ago

I'm not sure what this is but will guess it is a bombardier beetle in the subfamily Brachininae. These are really cool beetles with some very good defenses. Take a look at http://bugguide.net/node/view/16826/bgpa... for more information.

Gordon Dietzman Skunk Cabbage
Skunk Cabbage commented on by Gordon Dietzman Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA4 months ago

Could this be skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus)? Skunk cabbage has large, fleshy, bright green leaves, grows in moist soils often in forests. Take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symplocarpu.... I'll be curious as to what you decide.

Gordon Dietzman Tree swallow
Tree swallow commented on by Gordon Dietzman North Carolina, USA5 months ago

I too have spent way too many shutter snaps to catch tree swallows in flight...and have rarely been successful. Kudos to for trying and getting these shots!

Gordon Dietzman Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl commented on by Gordon Dietzman Minnesota, USA5 months ago

Thanks everyone for your kind comments....

Gordon Dietzman Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl commented on by Gordon Dietzman Minnesota, USA5 months ago

Thanks Patty and Austin. I visited Sax-Zim Bog (Minnesota) for an afternoon and the next morning and found three rare species of owls: snowy, great gray, and northern hawk owls. I managed to photograph all three with varying success, but these two shots were my favorites of the trip. Sax-Zim Bog is an up and coming winter birding location (although summer is also very good). There is some talk of it becoming a National Wildlife Refuge because of its rare and unusual species. Very cool place (especially in winter...grin).