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Mexican fruit bat

Artibeus toltecus.

Description:

I found a large family of bats hanging upside down from the ceiling of an abandoned house in the middle of nowhere in an oak forest. Las pic show the old house.

Habitat:

Oak forest.


No species ID suggestions

29 Comments (1–25)

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 4 years ago

Thank you Karen and Sergio

Sergio Monteiro
Sergio Monteiro 4 years ago

I like second photo very much.

KarenL
KarenL 4 years ago

Awesome captures Luis! I love #2!

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

It is now in the North American Bat Tracker. Thank you Ava.

Ava T-B
Ava T-B 6 years ago

Please consider adding this spotting to the new Bat Tracker mission at http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/1830...

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Gracias Yuriana

YurianaMartínez
YurianaMartínez 6 years ago

nice as all your pics Luis. Felicidades!

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Thank you shekainah d. alaban

The it seems the house is not abandoned at all.

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Thank you VictoriaShirleyPhotography

oh my gosh they are so cute!

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Thank you Carol, Gerardo, nexttogone, Yuko and Ava T-B

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Thank you very much Lauren for all this info and work for the correct ID of these beautiful bats. Best regards.

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 6 years ago

Hi Luis. Dr. Wilson just wrote "After enlarging the 4 photos and looking at them in depth with my colleague Al Gardner, I think the Leptonycteris nivalis is correct, but now I think the rest of them are actually Artibeus toltecus, a smaller species of Artibeus".
So these three pictures are now officially Artibeus toltecus. Makes more sense, since they were all in the same house.
Saludos.

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Thanks Roland, I´ll be waiting for your post of Flying Fox.

RolandEGauthier
RolandEGauthier 6 years ago

Nice shot, Here in Borneo we have the largest fruit bats called Flying Fox, we hear them every night in my fruit trees, I always try to get a picture of them but always fail as they fly off or close up making it harder to see. But I hope to see one one day and get a picture, sometimes in right time you can see them before sunset...we have many little fruit bats like the ones you post in my Mango trees or banana trees....

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Lauren, thank you very much for the info. Dr. Wilson is right, the pictures 1 and 2 are from the same room and the third picture is from a second room in the same old abandoned house in the forest. This is amazing, I couldn't tell the difference.

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 6 years ago

Hi Luis, Dr. Wilson of the Smithsonian confirms that pictures 1 and 2 are of the Mexican Fruit Bat Artibeus jamaicensis. He thinks the 3rd one might be Sturnira lilium (also a fruit eating bat), but is awaiting a second opinion. Were all these bats in exactly the same place? Could the Sturnira have been separated?

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Gracias Noel

Noel Buensuceso
Noel Buensuceso 6 years ago

Great series Luis!

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Thank you Despina Tsafetopoulou for the ID and the link

Ava T-B
Ava T-B 6 years ago

This is such a great series.

YukoChartraw
YukoChartraw 6 years ago

Cute! Must have been nice to be welcome by such a big family!

nexttogone
nexttogone 6 years ago

Too cool! ")

Gerardo Aizpuru
Gerardo Aizpuru 6 years ago

Great series Luis :)

San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

Lat: 22.20, Long: -100.57

Spotted on Oct 14, 2012
Submitted on Nov 16, 2012

Reference

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