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Birds of the World

There are over 10,000 living species of birds on the planet. They can be found in ecosystems across ...

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Butterflies & Moths of the World

Butterflies and Moths are insects of the order Lepidoptera. Their brilliant colors have inspired ...

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WILD Cities: Urban Biodiversity

Millions of city-dwellers walk their local streets every day, but many overlook the multitude of ...

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Mission WILD

The WILD Foundation works to protect & interconnect at least half of the planet’s land & water to ...

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Moths of the World

Moths? Yes: a world of sphinxes, hawks, owls, tigers, and scary eyes, all waiting for you outside ...

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Flowers of North America

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Mushroom Mapping

Mushroom ecology is a pivotal orientation point for exploring urban systems. Help us gather ...

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International Spider Survey

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs. The International Society of Arachnology ...

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Biodiversidad en España/Spain

Habitat: Indicar el sitio donde se encontró (campo, montaña, lago, mar, río...) Habitat: Enter the ...

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The Color Red

The color red is a bold color that represents passion. We would like to create a collection of ...

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Global Flight

To create a magnificent collection of images of your favourite fliers. Not just birds, but bats, ...

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Global Dragonflies & Damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are agile insects of the order Odonata. With a worldwide distribution ...

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Nature in Yellow

It would be so interesting to see all the yellow flowers, fruits, insects, animals of the world.

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Flowers of Europe

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Captive Animals

While we are all so focused on animals in nature, we ignore the fact theres wildlife in our own ...

wildlife photography meets citizen science

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Spottings
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Sallow favorited by Ornithoptera80 Oslo, Norway 14 minutes ago

The sallow is a moth of the family Noctuidae. The forewing is somewhat pointed, light yellow, with an irregular brownish transverse band in the middle. Outside this band there is a triangular, brownish spot with the front edge and a series of small, brown spots along the outer edge. In the inner part of the wing there are usually some diffuse, brownish spots.

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Jumping Spider favorited by Mark Ridgway Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines 2 hours ago

Salticidae; Heliophaninae; Carrhotus sp. This little jumping spider has been one of my favourites for several years now, but for much of that time, I thought that it was a male Carrhotus sannio (based on information back in 2017 from a web site which is now defunct). I published two spottings on Project Noah concerning this spider: https://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/83... ( Feb 11, 2022) and https://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/11... (Mar 12, 2022) both showing pictures taken on different dates and places (both within a few hundred metres of my house, back in 2017). In the first of these spottings I used the erroneous C. sannio ID, but was helped by Võ Anh Tuấn and modified it to Carrhotus sp. Then I also called the spider in the second spotting, Carrhotus sp. because I was still unable to identify it to species level. Now, here I am with a third spotting of the same species and still unable to name it properly. The specimen shown here, as you can see in "Habitat" below was much closer to home, it was right beside my gate. It is, rather, as if the spider knows that I cannot find him and he has come looking for me. Of course, he is very welcome on our plants and his arrival has reinforced my determination to find his species name.

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Fringed Jumping Spider favorited by Mark Ridgway Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines 2 hours ago

Salticidae; Portia; Portia fimbriata (Doleschall, 1859). In https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portia_(sp...), There is a great deal of very interesting information about the Genus Portia and, at the head of the Classification Table, there is a photo of Portia fimbriata which looks like my specimen. At the bottom of the Wiki article, there is a list of Portia spp. and it shows only one species present in Philippines, Portia labiata (on checking various websites, this does not match my spider). So, the question of distribution arises again. I then checked in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portia_fim... and saw that distribution is shown as Australia and Southeast Asia. Since Philippines is pretty much in the centre of Southeast Asia, I think that the problem of distribution is now resolved. Also, in the Reproduction and Lifecycle section, there is a very nice photo which confirms that my specimen is a male.

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Moth commented on by John B. Parshall, Colorado, United States 2 hours ago

Hi tomk3886, I don't know a lot about moths, but when I saw your pictures, my first thought was the Family Tortricidae. If you have not already checked, it might be worth looking. John B.

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Moth favorited by John B. Parshall, Colorado, United States 3 hours ago

Open habitat. Grasses, wildflowers, scattered pines and aspens. Elevation 8,373 ft.

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Fringed Jumping Spider spotted by John B. Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines 3 hours ago

Salticidae; Portia; Portia fimbriata (Doleschall, 1859). In https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portia_(sp...), There is a great deal of very interesting information about the Genus Portia and, at the head of the Classification Table, there is a photo of Portia fimbriata which looks like my specimen. At the bottom of the Wiki article, there is a list of Portia spp. and it shows only one species present in Philippines, Portia labiata (on checking various websites, this does not match my spider). So, the question of distribution arises again. I then checked in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portia_fim... and saw that distribution is shown as Australia and Southeast Asia. Since Philippines is pretty much in the centre of Southeast Asia, I think that the problem of distribution is now resolved. Also, in the Reproduction and Lifecycle section, there is a very nice photo which confirms that my specimen is a male.

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Lisa Powers




Lisa Powers is a nature photographer, writer and herpetologist/contract biologist who volunteers as a Project Noah Ranger.


Lisa's nature journal features photography of amphibians, insects and mammals in Tennessee!





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