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Birds of the World

There are over 10,000 living species of birds on the planet. They can be found in ecosystems across ...

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Butterflies & Moths of the World

Butterflies and Moths are insects of the order Lepidoptera. Their brilliant colors have inspired ...

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WILD Cities: Urban Biodiversity

Millions of city-dwellers walk their local streets every day, but many overlook the multitude of ...

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Mission WILD

The WILD Foundation works to protect & interconnect at least half of the planet’s land & water to ...

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Moths of the World

Moths? Yes: a world of sphinxes, hawks, owls, tigers, and scary eyes, all waiting for you outside ...

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Flowers of North America

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Mushroom Mapping

Mushroom ecology is a pivotal orientation point for exploring urban systems. Help us gather ...

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International Spider Survey

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs. The International Society of Arachnology ...

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Biodiversidad en España/Spain

Habitat: Indicar el sitio donde se encontró (campo, montaña, lago, mar, río...) Habitat: Enter the ...

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The Color Red

The color red is a bold color that represents passion. We would like to create a collection of ...

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Global Flight

To create a magnificent collection of images of your favourite fliers. Not just birds, but bats, ...

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Global Dragonflies & Damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are agile insects of the order Odonata. With a worldwide distribution ...

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Nature in Yellow

It would be so interesting to see all the yellow flowers, fruits, insects, animals of the world.

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Flowers of Europe

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Captive Animals

While we are all so focused on animals in nature, we ignore the fact theres wildlife in our own ...

wildlife photography meets citizen science

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Spottings
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Spotting spotted by mnc2113 Mangatarem, Ilocos Region, Philippines an hour ago

Lowland garden

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Spotting spotted by mnc2113 Mangatarem, Ilocos Region, Philippines an hour ago

Residential garden

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Tender-skinned House Gecko commented on by John B. Iloilo City, Western Visayas, Philippines an hour ago

Hi Francis, I posted a spotting earlier today showing a Tender-skinned House Gecko (Butiki) and I am just about to post another one this evening featuring a Butiki that my wife photographed for me back in 2014. The reason for contacting you is that I would like to mention your spotting as another example. Is that OK with you ? John B.

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Butiki commented on by John B. Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines 2 hours ago

Hi Mark, just to confirm you were, of course right. This Butiki has a new tail. My 2014 picture shows a tail with no scar tissue. So no replacement tail there and my harebrained idea goes in the trash can. Sorry. John B.

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Butiki commented on by John B. Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines 3 hours ago

Hi again Mark. your two comments on the Butiki just arrived while I was answering you about the spider. I like your splat idea. The "new tail" was my first reaction also, but I'm not so sure. I didn't mention it in my spotting to give myself a little more time to research. I have a feeling that this species always looks like that (the other Butiki, Hemidactylus frenatus only has the "join" showing when it really has just grown a new tail. I saw a Gehyra mutilata in Francis Floe's collection and it has the "join" and I am pretty sure I have one from 2014 that also has it. I intend to dig out the old one this evening and have a look at some more on the internet just to square it away. Thanks again. John B.

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Ringneck blenny. Moma favorited by Zlatan Celebic La Manga, Región de Murcia, Spain 3 hours ago

The moma is the species Parablennius pilicornis, a marine fish of the blenny family. Its scientific name comes from the Greek: para (next to) + blennios (mucosity) + pilicornis (horns of hairs). The body of Parablennius pilicornis is elongated and somewhat laterally compressed, especially as its body runs. They can reach sizes up to 13 cm in length. One of the characteristics that differentiate this species from others within the family is the presence of short supraorbital appendages that form bundles of filaments that resemble an eyebrow, hence the specific epithet pilicornis. From its head, its large eyes located in the upper lateral part stand out, these being very mobile. The mouth is located in a lower position and has thick lips. The skin of Parablennius pilicornis, as in other blennies, is bare, that is, it lacks scales. Instead they secrete a mucous substance that makes them very slippery to the touch, which has given them the common name of slugs. Certain males during the breeding season adopt a livery with the entire body dark blue almost black.

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Lisa Powers




Lisa Powers is a nature photographer, writer and herpetologist/contract biologist who volunteers as a Project Noah Ranger.


Lisa's nature journal features photography of amphibians, insects and mammals in Tennessee!





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