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Birds of the World

There are over 10,000 living species of birds on the planet. They can be found in ecosystems across ...

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Butterflies & Moths of the World

Butterflies and Moths are insects of the order Lepidoptera. Their brilliant colors have inspired ...

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WILD Cities: Urban Biodiversity

Millions of city-dwellers walk their local streets every day, but many overlook the multitude of ...

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Mission WILD

The WILD Foundation works to protect & interconnect at least half of the planet’s land & water to ...

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Moths of the World

Moths? Yes: a world of sphinxes, hawks, owls, tigers, and scary eyes, all waiting for you outside ...

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Flowers of North America

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Mushroom Mapping

Mushroom ecology is a pivotal orientation point for exploring urban systems. Help us gather ...

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International Spider Survey

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs. The International Society of Arachnology ...

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Biodiversidad en España/Spain

Habitat: Indicar el sitio donde se encontró (campo, montaña, lago, mar, río...) Habitat: Enter the ...

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The Color Red

The color red is a bold color that represents passion. We would like to create a collection of ...

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Global Flight

To create a magnificent collection of images of your favourite fliers. Not just birds, but bats, ...

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Global Dragonflies & Damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are agile insects of the order Odonata. With a worldwide distribution ...

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Nature in Yellow

It would be so interesting to see all the yellow flowers, fruits, insects, animals of the world.

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Flowers of Europe

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Captive Animals

While we are all so focused on animals in nature, we ignore the fact theres wildlife in our own ...

wildlife photography meets citizen science

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Spottings
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Crab Spider spotted by John B. Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines 7 minutes ago

Thomididae; Thomisinae; Runcinia insecta C. L. Koch, 1875. I was slightly confused when trying to ID this spider. This was before I joined Project Noah, but I used to look at P.N. spottings to help with ID's. I saw a similar spider to mine on https://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/11... which called the spider Runcinia albostriata, which was right. But then I saw a French website http://www.dipode-vie.net/Arachnides/Tho... which had wonderful pictures shown as R. insecta. The explanation offered was "Cette espèce montre une fine ligne blanche sur le céphalothorax et l'abdomen qui lui a donné le nom de albostriata qu'elle a longtemps porté avant de reprendre le nom de sa première description." I don't remember much of my schoolboy French, but I translated it roughly as "This species displays a fine white line on the cephalothorax and abdomen which gave it the name albostriata which it held for a long time before reverting to the name in its original description" - obviously referring to Runcinia insecta C. L. Koch, 1875. Problem solved.

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Porcelain fungus favorited by Rithmini Dinhara Otterlo, Gelderland, Netherlands 21 minutes ago

The caps of this lovely mushroom are rounded and tend to remain broadly domed rather than completely flat as the fruiting bodies mature. The caps can grow 2 to 8 cm in diameter are semi-transparent and white. The gills show through the thin cap flesh, giving the margin a striate appearance. A mucous slime covers the cap during wet weather. The gills of the Porcelain fungus are translucent white at first, sometimes developing an ochre tint as the fruiting body ages, adnate, broad and very distant. The stems are 3 to 7 mm in diameter, up to 8 cm long, and often curved so as to bring the cap to the horizontal in situations where large tufts of Porcelain fungi are attached to a small area of the host. The stems are slender, with a substantial stem ring. Above the ring the stem is white, below the ring it is slightly striate and greyish.

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Blue-banded Bee commented on by John B. Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines 46 minutes ago

To: Mark Ridgway
Thanks for your comment Mark and thanks also for all the work you put into helping everyone to enjoy Project Noah. John B.

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White Spotted Pine Sawyer favorited by Mark Ridgway Lat: 39.93 Lon: -106.16 an hour ago

Black beetle with long antennae.

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Blue-banded Bee commented on by Mark Ridgway Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines an hour ago

Yes it's hard to take the news here from a biodiversity point of view. And then so many are still talking about getting their lives back to pre-covid 'normal'. They have learned nothing.
Australia has some biological commonality with your area for example the lumpy spider I recognised immediately as a 'Poltys sp.' as we have a good variety of the genus here. It was an easy head start in the search. Glad you are enjoying PN.. keep the excellent posts coming as we have nothing to find here in a very wet winter.

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Porcelain fungus favorited by John B. Ede, Gelderland, Netherlands an hour ago

The caps of this lovely mushroom are rounded and tend to remain broadly domed rather than completely flat as the fruiting bodies mature. The caps can grow 2 to 8 cm in diameter are semi-transparent and white. The gills show through the thin cap flesh, giving the margin a striate appearance. A mucous slime covers the cap during wet weather. The gills of the Porcelain fungus are translucent white at first, sometimes developing an ochre tint as the fruiting body ages, adnate, broad and very distant. The stems are 3 to 7 mm in diameter, up to 8 cm long, and often curved so as to bring the cap to the horizontal in situations where large tufts of Porcelain fungi are attached to a small area of the host. The stems are slender, with a substantial stem ring. Above the ring the stem is white, below the ring it is slightly striate and greyish.

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Lisa Powers




Lisa Powers is a nature photographer, writer and herpetologist/contract biologist who volunteers as a Project Noah Ranger.


Lisa's nature journal features photography of amphibians, insects and mammals in Tennessee!





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