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Birds of the World

There are over 10,000 living species of birds on the planet. They can be found in ecosystems across ...

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Butterflies & Moths of the World

Butterflies and Moths are insects of the order Lepidoptera. Their brilliant colors have inspired ...

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WILD Cities: Urban Biodiversity

Millions of city-dwellers walk their local streets every day, but many overlook the multitude of ...

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Mission WILD

The WILD Foundation works to protect & interconnect at least half of the planet’s land & water to ...

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Moths of the World

Moths? Yes: a world of sphinxes, hawks, owls, tigers, and scary eyes, all waiting for you outside ...

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Flowers of North America

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Mushroom Mapping

Mushroom ecology is a pivotal orientation point for exploring urban systems. Help us gather ...

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International Spider Survey

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs. The International Society of Arachnology ...

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Biodiversidad en España/Spain

Habitat: Indicar el sitio donde se encontró (campo, montaña, lago, mar, río...) Habitat: Enter the ...

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The Color Red

The color red is a bold color that represents passion. We would like to create a collection of ...

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Global Flight

To create a magnificent collection of images of your favourite fliers. Not just birds, but bats, ...

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Global Dragonflies & Damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies are agile insects of the order Odonata. With a worldwide distribution ...

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Nature in Yellow

It would be so interesting to see all the yellow flowers, fruits, insects, animals of the world.

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Flowers of Europe

We want you to help us build a photo collection of flowers from around the world. Show us what ...

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Backyard Habitats of the World

Some of the most remarkable nature and wildlife can be seen right in your own backyard! The focus ...

wildlife photography meets citizen science

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Spottings
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Red-backed Flameback favorited by AntónioGinjaGinja Western Province, Sri Lanka 19 minutes ago

Red-Backed Flameback or Lesser Sri Lanka Flameback (Dinopium psarodes) is a species of bird in the Picidae family, which includes the Sri Lanka Red-Backed Woodpecker and the Ceylon Red-Backed Woodpecker. Dinopium benghalense psarodes was later identified as a subspecies of the Black-rumped flameback (Dinopium benghalense). It was discovered to hybridize with the Black-rumped Flameback in this study. The hybridization is concentrated north of a border stretching from Trincomalee to the base of Puttalam lagoon and south of a border stretching from Mullaitivu to Mannar. It is one of three red-colored Flameback species found only in Sri Lanka and the Philippines.

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Red-backed Flameback spotted by Isuru Madusankha Western Province, Sri Lanka an hour ago

Red-Backed Flameback or Lesser Sri Lanka Flameback (Dinopium psarodes) is a species of bird in the Picidae family, which includes the Sri Lanka Red-Backed Woodpecker and the Ceylon Red-Backed Woodpecker. Dinopium benghalense psarodes was later identified as a subspecies of the Black-rumped flameback (Dinopium benghalense). It was discovered to hybridize with the Black-rumped Flameback in this study. The hybridization is concentrated north of a border stretching from Trincomalee to the base of Puttalam lagoon and south of a border stretching from Mullaitivu to Mannar. It is one of three red-colored Flameback species found only in Sri Lanka and the Philippines.

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Great cormorant commented on by thewndrr Kennington, England, United Kingdom an hour ago

Good capture man!

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Great cormorant favorited by thewndrr Kennington, England, United Kingdom an hour ago

was hiding in the bushes lol the twigs was blocking the view

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Lappet Moth (caterpillar) favorited by SukanyaDatta Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines an hour ago

Lasiocampidae; Pinarinae; Streblote; Streblote castanea (Swinhoe, 1892). The caterpillar shown in my photos was spotted this afternoon in our backyard. When I transferred the pictures to my laptop, to see them better, I knew immediately that I didn't have a clue as to the identification of this organism, other than recognising it as a moth larva. So, I set about the task of identification in my own amateur way and I think I got it right. In the hope that it might help other novices like myself, I will outline how I went about finding the name of this moth. I am slightly familiar with Tussock Moth larvae (Lymantriinae) and also Lappet Moths (Lasiocampidae) because I know that they are both "hairy". I also know the name of the tree they were on So, I was already leaning towards one of those two types. I started by asking Google which moths used Moringa oleifera (the tree) as a host plant. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_ol..... - appeared on my screen and in the Ecology Section, it stated that its pests included bark-eating caterpillars, hairy caterpillars and green leaf caterpillars. My caterpillars were hairy and since they did not have "Tussocks" (I wasn't sure about the black things near the head), I went looking for Lasiocampidae larvae in inaturalist.org. I saw Streblote stupidum, but it wasn't an exact match. After considerably more searching, I couldn't come up with an exact match. So, then I wondered if my caterpillars could belong to the Genus Streblote since S. stupidum was very close to being a match. I asked Google about the distribution of the Genus Streblote and that led me to https://www.biotaxa.org/em/article/view/...... - this was a scientific paper which confirmed that the species Streblote castanea was the sp. in Philippines and went on to detail that it was present on the following islands:- Cebu, Luzon. Mindanao, Mindoro, Negros, Palawan, Panay and Samar. Now, I was pretty much all set to identify my caterpillars as the larvae of S. castanea. Just one more step was required to give me the evidence I needed. I had to find out if there was more than one Streblote sp. in the Philippines. My luck was in, a quick visit to Philippine Lepidoptera soon confirmed that they had only four specimens displayed under the name Streblote castanea and no other spp. from the Genus Streblote. Of course, that does not mean that are no other Streblote spp. in the Philippines, it just means that PhiLep doesn't have any others, but since they are the foremost site in this field, I can feel pretty secure in calling these larvae Streblote castanea. However, please see Notes below.

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Lappet Moth (caterpillar) spotted by John B. Palauig, Central Luzon, Philippines 4 hours ago

Lasiocampidae; Pinarinae; Streblote; Streblote castanea (Swinhoe, 1892). The caterpillar shown in my photos was spotted this afternoon in our backyard. When I transferred the pictures to my laptop, to see them better, I knew immediately that I didn't have a clue as to the identification of this organism, other than recognising it as a moth larva. So, I set about the task of identification in my own amateur way and I think I got it right. In the hope that it might help other novices like myself, I will outline how I went about finding the name of this moth. I am slightly familiar with Tussock Moth larvae (Lymantriinae) and also Lappet Moths (Lasiocampidae) because I know that they are both "hairy". I also know the name of the tree they were on So, I was already leaning towards one of those two types. I started by asking Google which moths used Moringa oleifera (the tree) as a host plant. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_ol..... - appeared on my screen and in the Ecology Section, it stated that its pests included bark-eating caterpillars, hairy caterpillars and green leaf caterpillars. My caterpillars were hairy and since they did not have "Tussocks" (I wasn't sure about the black things near the head), I went looking for Lasiocampidae larvae in inaturalist.org. I saw Streblote stupidum, but it wasn't an exact match. After considerably more searching, I couldn't come up with an exact match. So, then I wondered if my caterpillars could belong to the Genus Streblote since S. stupidum was very close to being a match. I asked Google about the distribution of the Genus Streblote and that led me to https://www.biotaxa.org/em/article/view/...... - this was a scientific paper which confirmed that the species Streblote castanea was the sp. in Philippines and went on to detail that it was present on the following islands:- Cebu, Luzon. Mindanao, Mindoro, Negros, Palawan, Panay and Samar. Now, I was pretty much all set to identify my caterpillars as the larvae of S. castanea. Just one more step was required to give me the evidence I needed. I had to find out if there was more than one Streblote sp. in the Philippines. My luck was in, a quick visit to Philippine Lepidoptera soon confirmed that they had only four specimens displayed under the name Streblote castanea and no other spp. from the Genus Streblote. Of course, that does not mean that are no other Streblote spp. in the Philippines, it just means that PhiLep doesn't have any others, but since they are the foremost site in this field, I can feel pretty secure in calling these larvae Streblote castanea. However, please see Notes below.

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Lisa Powers




Lisa Powers is a nature photographer, writer and herpetologist/contract biologist who volunteers as a Project Noah Ranger.


Lisa's nature journal features photography of amphibians, insects and mammals in Tennessee!





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