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Green Sea Turtle

Chelonia mydas

Description:

he Green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas), also known as green turtle, black (sea) turtle, or Pacific green turtle, is a large sea turtle of the family Cheloniidae. It is the only species in the genus Chelonia. Its range extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Their common name derives from the usually green fat found beneath their carapace (upper shell). The green sea turtle is a sea turtle, possessing a dorsoventrally flattened body covered by a large, teardrop-shaped carapace and a pair of large, paddle-like flippers. It is usually lightly colored, although parts of the carapace can be almost black in the eastern Pacific. Unlike other members of its family, such as the hawksbill sea turtle and loggerhead sea turtle, C. mydas is mostly herbivorous. The adults commonly inhabit shallow lagoons, feeding mostly on various species of seagrasses. Like other sea turtles, they migrate long distances between feeding grounds and hatching beaches. Many islands worldwide are known as Turtle Island due to green sea turtles nesting on their beaches. Females crawl out on beaches, dig nests and lay eggs during the night. Later, hatchlings emerge and walk into the water. Those that reach maturity may live to age 80 in the wild.

Habitat:

Green sea turtles move across three habitat types, depending on their life stage. They lay eggs on beaches. Mature turtles spend most of their time in shallow, coastal waters with lush seagrass beds. Adults frequent inshore bays, lagoons and shoals with lush seagrass meadows. Entire generations often migrate between one pair of feeding and nesting areas. Turtles spend most of their first five years in convergence zones within the open ocean These young turtles are rarely seen as they swim in deep, pelagic waters. Green sea turtles typically swim at 2.5-3kph (0.7-0.8 m/s).

Notes:

This little guy was spotted at Turtle Beach on Oahu.

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1 Comment

AngelaHuntemer
AngelaHuntemer 8 years ago

Lanaikea is the name of the beach.

alyjo85
Spotted by
alyjo85

Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, USA

Spotted on Dec 4, 2011
Submitted on Feb 4, 2012

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