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ShannonE

ShannonE

I'm a marine mammal scientist located on Maui, Hawaii.

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ShannonE Red Salamander
Red Salamander commented on by ShannonE Georgia, USA9 years ago

Love it. Still as great a shot now as it was when I saw your post on r/herpetology! ;)

ShannonE Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by ShannonE Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada9 years ago

Will do, for sure!

ShannonE Western BLack Widow(immature)
Western BLack Widow(immature) commented on by ShannonE Tulare, California, USA9 years ago

How cool! Beautiful coloration.

ShannonE Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by ShannonE Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada9 years ago

I would, but my guy is from the eastern seaboard! Yellow-bellied sliders are native to the southeastern United States, which is where I am.

ShannonE Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by ShannonE Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada9 years ago

Sounds like a good plan. I am pretty familiar with Pond sliders (both Yellow-bellied and Red-eared subspecies!), so if you have any questions, comment and I will be happy to help!

Also, if you go to this site: http://www.bcreptiles.ca/turtles.htm
you will see that there are only three species of freshwater turtle in BC. The Western Pond turtle does not have stripes on its skin, the Painted turtle has a much flatter shell, so that leaves the Red-eared Slider (which is, like I said, a subspecies of Pond Slider). I hope this helps!

ShannonE Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by ShannonE Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada9 years ago

No, but Yellow-bellied sliders and Red-eared sliders are the same species (Trachemys scripta), just different subspecies. The main difference between them is the mark behind the eye; Red-eared sliders have a red marking whereas Yellow-bellied sliders have a yellow "S" shape. Both subspecies often darken with age, obscuring these markings.

ShannonE Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk commented on by ShannonE North Carolina, USA9 years ago

Cooper's Hawks don't have the white bars on the wings that are present on this bird; they also don't have the red on the "shoulders," which are indicative of the Red-shouldered Hawk.

ShannonE Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by ShannonE Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada9 years ago

Weird; comments got out of order.

Anyway, this is true, but as the turtles get older, it can often become very difficult to spot that red mark as most adults become darker with age.

You can see dark coloring in a Yellow-bellied Pond Slider (Trachemys scripta scripta) in one of my spottings.

ShannonE Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by ShannonE Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada9 years ago

I don't think this is a Painted turtle; Painted turtles have less domed shells, and they don't have those black spots on the underside of the marginal scutes. Those are really indicative of Pond sliders, and one subspecies of the Pond slider has been introduced into British Columbia: the Red-eared slider.

ShannonE Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse commented on by ShannonE Athens-Clarke County, Georgia, USA9 years ago

Thanks! I will add it.

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