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Gray's Leaf Insect

Phyllium bioculatum

Description:

Probably one of the most remarkably masters of mimicry and camouflage in animal kingdom.It can stay immobile for several hours and can move in swaying motion like a leaf blown by a soft wind to evade predators or confuse prey. It feeds on divers young leaves of trees or bushes.

Habitat:

Tropical forest under trees canopies and bushes.


1 Species ID Suggestions

Gray's Leaf Insect (f)
Phyllium bioculatum Flickr


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20 Comments

vm.bharathiraja
vm.bharathiraja 2 years ago

Mark Ridgeway
(vm.bharathiraja) Life experiences accidental variations and one of this animal's distant ancestors did not get eaten by a bird because it looked a little bit like a leaf. It's offspring looked like it (and therefore slightly like a leaf). The birds then found some of those children except for the ones that looked even more like a leaf. etc. etc. x100000 until today they all look very much like a leaf.

Mark,
Thanks for such a brief answer and your time.I feel your answer says separation from all.i.e.Survival of the fittest.

But I just want to go deep.Homo sapiens ,we are hiding ourself from enemies by wearing camouflage cloth (military).We are having reasoning sense.

But does the insect know that it is camouflaged.

AlbertKang
AlbertKang 2 years ago

Yes, stay safe when out there, John.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 years ago

Yes John.. the world is watching. Stay safe.

I'm grateful too for your contributions guys. In fact I never thought there is this kind of insect in the area and there maybe more unrecorded species , its just bit difficult to explore the place because of the never ending armed conflicts in the area.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Thank you for your contributions on this spotting Mark and Albert! As the discussion goes on re. ID and the spotting is highly popular on our official page I'm leaving it in the spotlight for another day.

AlbertKang
AlbertKang 2 years ago

@Mark, visually, this one does not match Phyllium bioculatum too.
The lobes/appendages on the legs of P.bioculatum are much bigger.
The end of abdomen of P.bioculatum is flat or squarish, whereas this one is pointed.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 years ago

I don't suppose someone's pet has escaped !? LOL

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 years ago

Thanks Albert. I couldn't see anything wrong... glad to have an expert. :)
Sorry John I should have checked range properly.

AlbertKang
AlbertKang 2 years ago

@Mark, this is not Phyllium bioculatum which is not recorded from Philippines.

The nearest likely sp is Phyllium ericoriai known from south Luzon and nearby islands including Marinduque.

As this could be the first documentation of Phyllium from Panay Island, it is not possible to verify with certainty that it is Phyllium ericoriai.

Nice Spotting, Joahn Alaban. Would be a nice addition to this Mission :

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/1222...

@Mark Ridgway - Thanks for the ID Mark :) .

Yes Mark it might,since guava is a very common fruit tree in our country both in populated and forested area in fact there mountainous peaks here where almost 90 % of the surface is dominated by wild guavas.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 years ago

I read somewhere that they are mimicking guava leaf.

Felix Fleck
Felix Fleck 2 years ago

Awesome spotting! I'm still to see one of these in the wild. Congrats.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 years ago

Congratulations John.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Congratulations John, this amazing leaf insect is our Spotting of the Day! Nice to see you again on Project Noah!

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/projectnoah/pho...

Twitter:
https://twitter.com/projectnoah/status/8...

Leuba Ridgway
Leuba Ridgway 2 years ago

Looks like a citrus leaf - would love to see one of these some day ..

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 years ago

(vm.bharathiraja) Life experiences accidental variations and one of this animal's distant ancestors did not get eaten by a bird because it looked a little bit like a leaf. It's offspring looked like it (and therefore slightly like a leaf). The birds then found some of those children except for the ones that looked even more like a leaf. etc. etc. x100000 until today they all look very much like a leaf.

vm.bharathiraja
vm.bharathiraja 2 years ago

How this camouflage is formed through evolution?

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 years ago

Amazing camouflage.

Capiz, Philippines

Lat: 11.34, Long: 122.86

Spotted on May 15, 2017
Submitted on Jun 11, 2017

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