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Malcolm Wilton-Jones

Malcolm Wilton-Jones

Noah Ranger, Wildlife Photographer, Glider Pilot, World Traveller. Retired and living in Spain, but still travelling!

Planet Earth 40ºN 0ºELat: 53.36, Long: -2.09

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Malcolm Wilton-Jones's friends

Carolina lindistar Atul Coni Camposano
DavidHaney Michael Orca Ruth Spigelman Mustafa Rustom
Malcolm Wilton-Jones Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones Tagbilaran, Bohol, Philippines5 days ago

I have now corrected the location on all your spottings using the information provided by your sister. You can copy these coordinates into the the location field in your next spotting from this location: Lat: 9.83, Long: 124.16 and this will then correct all future spottings.

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones Niger6 days ago

Hi, we have noticed that all your spottings are showing on the map in the middle of the Sahara desert in Africa and you may not be able to correct it so here are some help notes for using the map service: All you have to do when you select location is either enter coordinates if you know them, or leave it blank and press enter. With the latter option you will be taken to either your last used location or to Lat 0 Lon 0 on the map, and you can then drag and drop the pin in the correct place manually in conjunction with the zoom buttons for greater accuracy. Alternatively, let us know the correct location of your photographs and we can correct it for you.
In addition can you please confirm if you are using a Vivo 1806 mobile phone camera.

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Red Admiral
Red Admiral commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones Comunitat Valenciana, Spain2 months ago

Thanks Triggs.

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Acorns of the Kermes Oak
Acorns of the Kermes Oak commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones Comunitat Valenciana, Spain2 months ago

I don't think there is any connection except the name kermes. This Kermes Oak is restricted to the western Mediterranean region of Europe. Kermes is simply a desriptive name for something red or crimson in colour.

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Crested Tit; Herrerillo Capuchino
Crested Tit; Herrerillo Capuchino commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones Comunitat Valenciana, Spain2 months ago

Thanks Triggs

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Juvenile American White Ibis
Juvenile American White Ibis commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones New Providence, Bahamas2 months ago

Here is a link to the picture you originally posted: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/WUml00...
This shows the picture at full size with a lot more detail.

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Juvenile American White Ibis
Juvenile American White Ibis commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones New Providence, Bahamas2 months ago

I'm thinking about juvenile Ibis but not sure white, scarlet or other. When enlarged the bill appears more pink overall and slightly downcurved. the sunshine makes it look yellow at the base and around the eye but close up it is actually pale pink while the rest looks dark pink but not red. The other bird behind is paler, There is a third similar bird on the right but almost hidden. The two birds lower left are different.

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Red-veined Darter
Red-veined Darter commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones Comunitat Valenciana, Spain3 months ago

Thanks Brian.

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones गान्तोक, Sikkim, India3 months ago

There are several Barsine species in Sikkim, I have not checked them all but of those I have Barsine cuneonotatus is the closest, there may be others.

Malcolm Wilton-Jones Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by Malcolm Wilton-Jones गान्तोक, Sikkim, India3 months ago

Hi Williams family, thank you for your input on this Moth. I would be wary of your suggestion for this specific species due to the location it was seen in (Sikkim, India) being thousands of miles away from Borneo, Malaysia to which B. flavodiscalis is restricted to. Barsine is a huge family of very similar moths but specific species are mostly segregated into specific locations as per the following table: http://ftp.funet.fi/index/Tree_of_life/i...
There are many instances nowadays when specific species can only be positively identified by using DNA analysis which is not readily available to the masses. I would suggest looking closely at the distribution maps on the above site to determine the most likely species based on range.
Hopefully we can all learn a little from this.