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ScottRasmussen

ScottRasmussen

Amherst, MA

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ScottRasmussen Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by ScottRasmussen ES, Brazil4 years ago

This is the larva of a moth sometimes also called the hag moth. It's a wonderful creature, but don't touch; the hairs can cause a skin reaction in some people.

ScottRasmussen Musk Okra
Musk Okra commented on by ScottRasmussen จังหวัดนครศรีธรรมราช, Thailand8 years ago

It sure does look a lot like okra or cotton. The pods have a seam in them that isn't like cultivated okra, though. Pretty sure it's Malvaceae. Interesting plant.

ScottRasmussen Unknown spotting
Unknown spotting commented on by ScottRasmussen Texas, USA8 years ago

It's a Pussytoes, genus Antennaria. There aren't too many in that area, and I'm guessing Antennaria plantaginifolia. http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symb...

ScottRasmussen Climbing Cassia
Climbing Cassia commented on by ScottRasmussen Titusville, Florida, USA8 years ago

It's a Senna or Cassia, but I'm not sure of the species. There are a few native Sennas as well as a number of non-natives that are cultivated.

ScottRasmussen Blue Ground-cedar
Blue Ground-cedar commented on by ScottRasmussen Massachusetts, USA8 years ago

Thanks for all the nice comments everyone. Most of my photographs are more analytical, I'd guess you'd say, but this patch of plants inspired me to try and convey something beyond just getting a clear ID of them.

ScottRasmussen The Pale Didymoplexis
The Pale Didymoplexis commented on by ScottRasmussen Indonesia8 years ago

Pretty nice macro of a really cool little orchid. I always struggle to get even halfway sharp, decently exposed shots of tiny things in a low light forest.

ScottRasmussen Common Snapping Turtle
Common Snapping Turtle commented on by ScottRasmussen Amherst, Massachusetts, USA8 years ago

Posting a follow-up to this. It's two months later. I was down at the pond yesterday and saw mama, who managed to keep three of her six ducklings. They are quite large and have well developed adult plumage. Their wings are still too small for flight but they try them out frequently and I'm sure they'll be flying soon. It's a tough life for a duckling, even on a protected pond like this one. I'm surprised that even half the ducklings survived this long.

ScottRasmussen Blue Dasher
Blue Dasher commented on by ScottRasmussen Hadley, Massachusetts, USA8 years ago

Thanks. I'll update this spotting.

ScottRasmussen Common Snapping Turtle
Common Snapping Turtle commented on by ScottRasmussen Amherst, Massachusetts, USA8 years ago

It was very stressful watching them. I knew if I moved towards the water that the ducks would get nervous and head out into the pond, right into the jaws of the turtle, so I had to trust that mama duck would call her babies away in time. She did, twice, but I'm sure that lots of ducklings fall prey to the snappers every year.

ScottRasmussen Northern Parula
Northern Parula commented on by ScottRasmussen Amherst, Massachusetts, USA8 years ago

Thanks. I had no idea what kind of warbler they were. I'm definitely grateful for good field guides!

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