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European Common Frog

Rana temporaria

Description:

The 'Common Frog' is between 6 to 9 cm (2.4 to 3.5 in) long. The frog is found in a wide variety of areas including Europe, the Arctic Circle, Urals and even as far west as Ireland. The amphibian ranges in colour between yellowish, olive green, grey-brown, brown and olive-brown. Also, black and red varients have also been spotted in Scotland. The frog is capable of becoming lighter or darker in colour to blend with it's surroundings.

Habitat:

These are solitary creatures, living near ponds in long grass and marshes until the breeding season - which can start as early as February. Congregating around both wild and garden ponds there is a frenzy of activity whilst spawning takes place (please see video). My garden is quite big, with a good amount of species plants as well as vegitables. I provide lots of cover and shelter for the wildlife with piles of logs, leaves, stones, slate and muddy areas. I also leave the garden a little messy over-winter to provide shelter and food for wildlife. The grass is left on the 'long side' most of the time. and we back onto field and woodland area that stretch for miles. We have hundreds of frogs and toads in our garden at any one time (of all ages). Consequently we never have a problem with slugs and snails eating our plants. The frog in the photo comes to my small 'sink' pond every evening. He has got really tame now and enjoys me tickling his/her chin.

Notes:

All photos were taken in my garden. All videos were from pond in field at side of my garden. Above citation - Wikipedia (see reference)

1 Species ID Suggestions

European common frog
Rana temporaria Common frog


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7 Comments

Elizabeth Colley
Elizabeth Colley 9 years ago

Hi Daniele, thanks for advice. I have updated the spotting (please take a look). I am still kind of learning what is appropriate to write on the spottings. I have also joined the mission you recommended, and added this spotting.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 9 years ago

This all looks good to me Elizabeth! A very nice and compete spotting. My only suggestion is that you could add a bit more about your garden under the Habitat section. It doesn't need to be long. You may also consider joining this mission and add this spotting: http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/1075...

Elizabeth Colley
Elizabeth Colley 9 years ago

DanielePralong, I have updated the information on this frog ID. Would you mind having a look to see if I have got facts correct please. Thanks again for your help.

Elizabeth Colley
Elizabeth Colley 9 years ago

Thanks DanielePralong. I will write that up tonight, a little busy right now. I will get back to you when I have finished (so you can check it please).

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 9 years ago

Hi Elizabeth! I'd favour the common frog with the second shot. The most important difference between the two (the metatarsal tubercle) is unfortunately rarely visible on pictures :-(
On Project Noah you can give a give a partial ID as Frog, Rana sp., and mention the possibilities in your notes.

Elizabeth Colley
Elizabeth Colley 9 years ago

Thanks for your help Daniele. I have uploaded another photo of the same frog, but a side profile (hope this helps with snout identification).

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 9 years ago

Hi Elizabeth! Aren't amphibians fascinating? Their highly variable patterns make them hard to identify. I've made a suggestion for Rana temporaria, due mainly to the close dorsolateral folds. Rana arvalis could be another possibility, but the snout may not be pointy enough. These two can also be distinguished on the basis on the basis of a metatarsal tubercle, not visible on this shot. See what others say! Collins have a good guide on the Reptiles and Amphibian of Europe. Keep posting!

Elizabeth Colley
Spotted by
Elizabeth Colley

England, United Kingdom

Spotted on Jul 23, 2012
Submitted on Aug 30, 2012

Spotted for Mission

Reference

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