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Turquoise-browed Motmot

Eumomota superciliosa

Description:

Medium sized bird. There are various species in the Americas and this is characterized by it's turquoise feather bar above the eye. Brilliant colors throughout from head to tail. This species trims it's tail feathers.

Habitat:

Tropical dry forest on Pacific slope of Costa Rica.

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15 Comments

LarryGraziano
LarryGraziano 3 years ago

Gracias Jonathan and thanks DR.!

Felicitaciones. por el SOTD.
This is the National bird in Nicaragua .

DrNamgyalT.Sherpa
DrNamgyalT.Sherpa 3 years ago

Congrats Larry!

LarryGraziano
LarryGraziano 3 years ago

Thank you all. I am so glad that you enjoyed it!!!

HayleyB
HayleyB 3 years ago

Gorgeous! Thank you for sharing.

Michael Strydom
Michael Strydom 3 years ago

Beautiful Bird. Congrats on SOTD!

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 3 years ago

'Pájaro bobo' - plus a crazy tail which the girls have too.
Beautiful.. thank and congrats Larry.

Sergio Monteiro
Sergio Monteiro 3 years ago

Congratulations Larry.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 3 years ago

Congratulations Larry, your Turquoise-browed Motmot is our Spotting of the Day:

"Brightly colored from head to tail, this splendid Turquoise-browed Motmot (Eumomota superciliosa) is our Spotting of the Day! The most distinctive feature of motmots (family Momotidae) is their racket-tipped tail, which has captured considerable attention since Darwin. While both male and female motmots possess these distinctive tail feathers, males' tails are longer. These feathers initially grow intact, but the middle barbs are weakly attached to the shaft and fall off during preening, creating that disc-shaped ending. The tails are used by both sexes in a wag-display to deter predators, and as a sexual signal by males: males with the longest tails have greater pairing and reproductive success".

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LarryGraziano
LarryGraziano 3 years ago

Thank you all. I 'm glad you enjoyed it.

Hema
Hema 3 years ago

I don't think these birds know how beautiful they are!

Beautiful capture Larry,congrats and thanks for sharing

Nayeli
Nayeli 3 years ago

wow que ave tan bonita, linda foto ! :)

LarryGraziano
LarryGraziano 3 years ago

I am so glad you enjoyed it as much as I have!

SukanyaDatta
SukanyaDatta 3 years ago

BEAUTIFUL...I think Mother Nature used all her left over colours and created this bird. Thank you for sharing.

LarryGraziano
Spotted by
LarryGraziano

Tamarindo, Provincia Guanacaste, Costa Rica

Spotted on May 31, 2018
Submitted on Jul 15, 2018

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