Project Noah

Project Noah is a tool to explore and document wildlife and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere.

Join Project Noah Today

Sleepy Underwing

Catocala concumbens




2 species ID suggestions

Sapping
Sapping 7 years ago
Apple-and-thorn Skeletonizer
Choreutis pariana Choreutis pariana

21 Comments

bayucca
bayucca 7 years ago

I think it is the same thing as with the underpants, they do not show them freely... You can bet that all these "unnatural" poses are from pinned animal. You might touch some moths and open their wings, but the risk that they fly away is almost 100%. And not forget to hold your camera in the other hand.
I am not sure about Umbrosa. Best thing is check the geographical range and sort out the first bulk. Then take the next ones and google the name and looking for the general color shade you notice on the thumbnails (greenish, grayish!) and then sort out again...

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

I think you are right as well, but I don't recall that I could see red as it flew away.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

I believe you are right, but what about Catocala umbrosa (http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com/catumbr... Why do all the underwings pictured have their hind wing viewable?

bayucca
bayucca 7 years ago

check this one:
http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com/nacatoc...
probably the most complete guide to Catocalo sp.. I have the slight suspicion that my guess might not be the exactest one ...

bayucca
bayucca 7 years ago

I am wondering what seto would think about this one. Definitely a Noctuidae, Catocalinae, Catocalo sp., my closest guess would be Catocalo concumbens. There are at least 50 species in the whole US, all looking very similar, sometimes only in color shade, however, different colors usually occur also within the same species. So, good luck to verify my guess ;-)...

Sapping
Sapping 7 years ago

I can't recall honestly, but that sounds similar in size.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

Ok. @Sapping: Was yours the same size, about 70-85 mm?

Sapping
Sapping 7 years ago

Ok, thanks for the info. I'll see what I can find in the Noctuidae family.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

Thanks, I had my doubts as well.

bayucca
bayucca 7 years ago

I don't think this one is a Choretis sp., even not the same family. I would say it is a Noctuidae.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

@Sapping: I really do not think that this is an Apple-and-Thorn Skeletonizer because the species Choreutis pariana only has a wingspan 15 mm max.

Sapping
Sapping 7 years ago

I'm quite sure, I have a picture of the same species from last summer I'm uploading now. Mine was photographed near an apple tree and the region fits as well.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

@Sapping: Are you sure? I'm going to put it as this for now. Thanks!

KarenL
KarenL 7 years ago

Your mission range does just extend into Canada, but doesn't cover more than a fraction of the South East so that would still be misleading. You are welcome to continue to solicit spottings that are in the part of Canada that falls within the mission range - Toronto & Ottawa southwards.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

Should I change the title to Moths of Northeastern US and Southeastern Canada?

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

Some parts of Canada are in my 300 mile range, though.

KarenL
KarenL 7 years ago

Hi jgorneau, we note that you have extended your mission to include Canada.
As both Peter & I have explained to you previously, your mission range is a maximum of 300 miles.
Once you have successfully operated your mission for a period of time, we will be prepared to consider extending it, but only if you abide by the term & conditions you signed up to when you created this mission - i.e. that it is a local mission only.
We must therefore remove Canada from the title of the mission & any spottings that are outside of the local range.
Please do not solicit any more spottings beyond the range of this mission.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

Eventually, will the other moths be able to join, obviously after a certain number of spottings?

peter
peter 7 years ago

I've made the appropriate update to the misson and removed all spottings that are not within the regional scope. Thanks for understanding, and we hope to see you create a successful local mission in your neck of the woods :)

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

Does this mean I must delete the ones I have allowed into the mission?

KarenL
KarenL 7 years ago

Hi jgorneau. We see that you have created a mission entitled Moths of Planet Earth & are inviting other users to join. Please be aware that all new missions for individual users are local ones - in your case a 300 mile radius from New York, so you should only be soliciting spottings that fall within this range. Please change the title of your mission to more accurately reflect this - Moths of New York, or Moths of the North East US or something along these lines, & clarify the range in the mission overview so there will be no ambiguity for other users.
Once you have successfully operated this for a period of time & can demonstrate a good amount of local activity generated by this mission, you can apply to have the range extended.
Please read the new mission instructions as everything is outlined there in more detail.
Tahnks!

New York, USA

Lat: 42.36, Long: -74.05

Spotted on Feb 3, 2012
Submitted on Feb 4, 2012

Related spottings

Catocala Darling Underwing Sweetfern Underwing Yellow-Banded Underwing

Nearby spottings

Northern Cardinal Spring Crocus Unknown spotting Red-banded Leafhopper