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Devil's coach horse beetle

Ocypus olens

Description:

Small black beetle that is equipped with several different defensive mechanisms. It can unleash a painful bite with its strong pincer like jaws and release a smell with its stink glands at the end of its curled abdomen (pics 2 and 4).

Habitat:

Spotted in backyard.


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9 Comments

Brian38
Brian38 2 months ago

Thank you for the nomination António.

Brian38
Brian38 2 months ago

Thank you for your comments Maria and Mark.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 months ago

Nice series.

Maria dB
Maria dB 2 months ago

A scorpion imitator among the beetles!

Your spotting has been nominated for the Spotting of the Week. The winner will be chosen by the Project Noah Rangers based on a combination of factors including: uniqueness of the shot, status of the organism (for example, rare or endangered), quality of the information provided in the habitat and description sections. There is a subjective element, of course; the spotting with the highest number of Ranger votes is chosen. Congratulations on being nominated!

Brian38
Brian38 2 months ago

Thanks for your kind comments Neil, Leuba and Sukanya.

SukanyaDatta
SukanyaDatta 2 months ago

First that tide pool now, these...Brian who is your tour guide??? Such wonderful places; such interesting creatures. :)

Leuba Ridgway
Leuba Ridgway 2 months ago

I like pic 4 - he looks formidable !

Neil Ross
Neil Ross 2 months ago

Wow! Biting and smelly, I wonder if he has any friends? Such an unusual beetle. Thanks for sharing, Brian.

Brian38
Spotted by
Brian38

Federal Way, Washington, USA

Lat: 47.31, Long: -122.32

Spotted on Sep 16, 2019
Submitted on Sep 20, 2019

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http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocypus_olens Devil's coach horse beetle Rove beetle Head Devil's Coach-horse

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