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The Deceiver

Laccaria laccata

Description:

Laccaria laccata (Scop. ex Fr.) Cke. syn. Clitocybe laccata (Scop. ex Fr.) Kummer Rötlicher Lacktrichterling Clitocybe laqué Deceiver. Cap 1.5–6cm across, convex then flattened, often becoming finely wavy at the margin and centrally depressed, tawny to brick-red and striate at the margin when moist drying paler to ochre-yellow, surface often finely scurfy. Stem 50–100 x 6–10mm, concolorous with cap, tough and fibrous, often compressed or twisted. Flesh thin reddish-brown. Taste and smell not distinctive. Gills pinkish, dusted white with spores when mature. Spore print white. Spores globose, spiny, 7–10m in diameter. Habitat in troops in woods or heaths. Season summer to early winter. Very common but very variable in appearance and therefore often difficult to recognize at first sight, hence the popular name ‘Deceiver’. Edible but not worthwhile. (Never eat any mushroom until you are certain it is edible as many are poisonous and some are deadly poisonous.) Distribution, America and Europe. Comment Laccaria laccata var. pallidifolia (Pk.) Pk. Differs from the type form in its very pallid, whitish gills and generally smaller stature.

Notes:

Spotted these small orange slightly cup-shaped mushrooms growing on somewhat dry pine needle and leaf debris in rhododendron/hemlock forest in southern Appalachian/Blue Ridge mountains. There is a strange darkish stain in the immediate surround of the fungi which suggested to me that it was maybe growing where something had completely decomposed? Bear Creek Trail Ellijay GA

1 Species ID Suggestions

gully.moy
gully.moy 8 years ago
The Deciever
Laccaria Laccata


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15 Comments

QWMom
QWMom 7 years ago

I still think it's deceiver too. (Although both species in question are edible, you couldn't pay me money to eat them - just in case it turned out to be neither and was poisonous!) :)

Ok,Tiffany,thanks for the info,even so i continue to think that this one is a deciver :-)

TiffanyMarieMazz
TiffanyMarieMazz 7 years ago

AntónioGinjaGinja, Chanterelles come other colors besides yellow!

QWMom
QWMom 8 years ago

Adding another pic to the other posting now...

gully.moy
gully.moy 8 years ago

That would be great. Gills don't look decurrent so I'm already thinking Laccaria again.

QWMom
QWMom 8 years ago

Here's the other same-day spotting of what appeared to be the same type of mushroom in a different patch
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/173...
It's not a great shot, but you can see a little. When I get home tonight and have access to my picture files, I will see if I can crop down for detail on the gills of the broken mushrooms.

gully.moy
gully.moy 8 years ago

Hmm, I'm not too sure, Tiffany could be right... I was thrown a bit by how bright orange they are. Without a gill shot it is hard to say either way.

QWMom
QWMom 8 years ago

Thanks for your consideration :) these mushrooms def had caps with a depression in the center rather than being funnel shaped - pretty sure it's Laccaria (although as noted these were particularly orange)

I think that Gully nail it,to me is clearly a common deciver,the chanterelles are much more funnel shape,and more yellows than these,second photo is clearly a deciver to me :-)
Many times deciver haved that lettle funnel,more a little hole depression on the center,remember the name DECIVER,very variable shapes.

TiffanyMarieMazz
TiffanyMarieMazz 8 years ago

Did you check the gills? I think you have a wrong ID here... these look like chanterelles to me. Note the color and funnel shape of the cap - Laccaria does not have these traits.

gully.moy
gully.moy 8 years ago

I almost asked you for more detail, perfect! Yes this makes me more confident that they are Laccaria. I don't know the genus well enough to say that it is L. laccata for sure but it is the most common orangey Laccaria species.

QWMom
QWMom 8 years ago

Thanks! :)

QWMom
QWMom 8 years ago

I tried cropping the picture down to get more detail - do you still think so?

gully.moy
gully.moy 8 years ago

Or another similar Laccaria species, I believe. Yours are particularly orange though.

RedTopRanger
RedTopRanger 8 years ago

Very cool! such vibrant colors

QWMom
Spotted by
QWMom

Georgia, USA

Spotted on Jul 29, 2012
Submitted on Jan 31, 2013

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