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Water Lily Seed Pods

Lotus

Description:

Water Lilies send up seed pods in the center of thier flowers at the beginning of the season. These get pollenated and grow into these little grape looking things. As the seed pod matures they lose thier color and dry out and the holes contract, releasing seeds are dropped as wind, critters, or currents move the seed head. This ensures the widest distribution of seeds over time and location. Night visit to the Atlanta Botanical Gardens.



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8 Comments

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

Heather this would be an excellent addition to the Seed and Seed pods mission. Please consider joining!
http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8362...

HeatherMiller
HeatherMiller 7 years ago

Hi Craig, I do not know which one these are. I saw them at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens and they keep a lot of plants in their gardens from all over. So unfortunately, these do not have to be local. But, they do live outside in the gardens, so they are at least able to be narrowed to a range they live in. The ABG have many different species. Next time I go there, I will ask them what kind this is, to be more accurate.

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 7 years ago

Sorry to sound picky, it's just 'Water lily' also refers to Nymphea

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 7 years ago

Heather, the common name is Lotus and the scientific name is Nelumbo. There are only two species N. nucifera is Asian but widely cultivated and N.lutea is American.

HeatherMiller
HeatherMiller 7 years ago

Thanks Emma and Ashish.

Ashish Nimkar
Ashish Nimkar 7 years ago

Nelumbo Genus plant seeds.

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

I am really happy to see these because i have been quite curious about these lately.

HeatherMiller
Spotted by
HeatherMiller

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Lat: 33.79, Long: -84.37

Spotted on Sep 8, 2011
Submitted on Sep 19, 2011

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